The canadian northwest as it is today (classic reprint)


By Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic | [email protected]
Friday 3 November, 2017 , No Comments ↓

“The promise of the North is fading and the dreams of northerners are dying as we see a re-emergence of colonialism,” Bob McLeod said on Wednesday.

“For too long now policies have been imposed on us from Ottawa and southern Canada that, despite good intentions sometimes, and ignorance other times, are threatening our economic potential and the decades-long work that we as a government have taken on Indigenous reconciliation. Whether it be ill-conceived ways of funding social programs, or new and perplexing restrictions on our economic development, our spirit and energy are being sapped.”

Last winter, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau issued a moratorium on offshore oil and gas development in the Arctic, saying it was too risky for the environment. The federal government said the decision would be reviewed after five years.

However, in Canada’s North, where education and employment opportunities are scarce, especially in isolated Indigenous communities,  northern leaders pushed back   saying the decision would put the breaks on much-needed economic development.

In his statement on Wednesday, McLeod called the moratorium an attack on the territory’s economic development that would have ongoing repercussions.

By Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic | [email protected]
Friday 3 November, 2017 , No Comments ↓

“The promise of the North is fading and the dreams of northerners are dying as we see a re-emergence of colonialism,” Bob McLeod said on Wednesday.

“For too long now policies have been imposed on us from Ottawa and southern Canada that, despite good intentions sometimes, and ignorance other times, are threatening our economic potential and the decades-long work that we as a government have taken on Indigenous reconciliation. Whether it be ill-conceived ways of funding social programs, or new and perplexing restrictions on our economic development, our spirit and energy are being sapped.”

Last winter, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau issued a moratorium on offshore oil and gas development in the Arctic, saying it was too risky for the environment. The federal government said the decision would be reviewed after five years.

However, in Canada’s North, where education and employment opportunities are scarce, especially in isolated Indigenous communities,  northern leaders pushed back   saying the decision would put the breaks on much-needed economic development.

In his statement on Wednesday, McLeod called the moratorium an attack on the territory’s economic development that would have ongoing repercussions.

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By Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic | [email protected]
Friday 3 November, 2017 , No Comments ↓

“The promise of the North is fading and the dreams of northerners are dying as we see a re-emergence of colonialism,” Bob McLeod said on Wednesday.

“For too long now policies have been imposed on us from Ottawa and southern Canada that, despite good intentions sometimes, and ignorance other times, are threatening our economic potential and the decades-long work that we as a government have taken on Indigenous reconciliation. Whether it be ill-conceived ways of funding social programs, or new and perplexing restrictions on our economic development, our spirit and energy are being sapped.”

Last winter, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau issued a moratorium on offshore oil and gas development in the Arctic, saying it was too risky for the environment. The federal government said the decision would be reviewed after five years.

However, in Canada’s North, where education and employment opportunities are scarce, especially in isolated Indigenous communities,  northern leaders pushed back   saying the decision would put the breaks on much-needed economic development.

In his statement on Wednesday, McLeod called the moratorium an attack on the territory’s economic development that would have ongoing repercussions.

You're currently on {{currently_on}}. However, it looks like you listened to {{listened_to}} on {{device_name}} {{time}}.

The Northwest Passage is a sea route that connects the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago . In the past, the Northwest Passage has been virtually impassable because it was covered by thick, year-round sea ice. However, in the past few years, climate change is allowing commercial traffic to pass through the Arctic Ocean via this once-impossible route.

The potential benefits of a clear Northwest Passage are significant. Ship routes from Europe to eastern Asia would be 4,000 kilometers (2,500 miles) shorter. Alaskan oil could move quickly by ship to ports in the eastern United States. The vast mineral resources of the Canadian North will be much easier and economical to develop and ship to market.

There has been a progressive, year-by-year decline in the thickness and extent of Arctic sea ice. The graph on this page shows how the extent of Arctic sea ice has been on a steady decline between 1979 and 2014.

NASA studies have shown that the extent of Arctic sea ice is declining at a rate of several percent per decade. As the ice cover is removed, solar radiation penetrates the water and warms it, instead of being reflected from the white ice.

Another factor that contributes to warming of the Arctic Ocean is the increase in discharge rates of rivers draining from Eurasia. These freshwater rivers now receive increasing runoff from melting glaciers . This runoff is much warmer than the Arctic Ocean water. The net result is a slight warming of the Arctic Ocean waters and a dilution of salinity.

The map at the top of this page shows possible routes through the Northwest Passage. Ships traveling west would enter the Passage through Baffin Bay, pass through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago by various routes, exit into the Beaufort Sea and then out into the Pacific Ocean through the Chukchi Sea and Bering Sea.


Pacific Northwest - Wikipedia

Northwest Territories - Wikipedia

    By Eilís Quinn, Eye on the Arctic | [email protected] Friday 3 November, 2017 , No Comments ↓“The promise of the North is fading and the dreams of northerners are dying as we see a re-emergence of
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