Robot cartoon movie in hindi


Films about robots have long captured the imagination of movie goers, who may or may not believe in its existence in the not-so-distant-future. Here are the top films about these intelligent mechanical human friends... or enemies. Check it out!

When: 2004 Who: Will Smith and Bridget Moynahan What: In the not so distant future, (2035), a detective, who dislikes the rapid advancement of technology, investigates a crime that may have been caused by a robot.

When: 1982 Who: Harrison Ford and Sean Young What: In the year 2019, genetically engineered human-looking robots called replicants, are hunted down after hijacking a ship in space. Special police operative, or "Blade Runner" Rick Deckard, played by Harrison Ford, must track down the four robots in question.

When: 1987 Who: Peter Weller, Nancy Allen and Dan O'Herlihy What: A terminally wounded police officer is brought back to life as a super human/machine cyborg used to clean up the crime-ridden streets of a futuristic Detroit. Throughout the film, RoboCop is haunted by the memories of his painful past.

When: 1984 Who: Arnold Schwarzenegger and Linda Hamilton What: A relentless assassin robot called Terminator is sent from the future (2029) to kill Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton). Kyle Reese (Michael Biehn), a soldier from the bleak robot-populated future, is sent back to protect Connor.

When: 2001 Who: Haley Joel Osment, Jude Law and Frances O'Connor What: Based on Brian Aldiss' short story, "Super-Toys Last All Summer Long," science fiction drama "A.I.: Artificial Intelligence" is about a robot child who wants to be "real." David, an android who looks just like a human boy, is uniquely programmed with the ability to love.

WALL•E is set in the far future where humans have left Earth on a giant ship called the Axiom  because of all the garbage pile-up. The only known inhabits now are a robot named WALL•E , who must keep up the mess and his cockroach friend Hal . However, all that changes when WALL•E meets a robot named EVE and falls in love with her. Soon the two robots are heading into space and onto the Axiom on a mission that could bring humankind back to Earth.

Over the end credits, the restoration of Earth is depicted through pictures that evolve from rather primitive hieroglyphs to impressive paintings. As the years pass, Earth becomes as lush and green as ever, and humans have become active to the extent that they regain their former body structures. In the end, WALL•E and EVE are still together, and they observe a large tree; it is shown that this tree is the same plant  that had brought them home many years before.

WALL-E was also the first Pixar movie to feature live-action footage, which was used to give the caricatured CGI characters an appearance that suggested they had severely devolved from their ancestors who had left Earth. Much of the "fat" on these characters was modeled on baby fat and marine mammal blubber, which tends to have quiet a different appearance from the fat on an obese adult.

To get the right look of the sci-fi films of the '60s and '70s, Pixar brought in famed cinematographer Roger Deakins and ILM visual-effects guru Dennis Muren to help the Pixarians create effects like barrel distortion and lens flare. [11] These had been absent from Pixar's early releases and used only minimally in then-recent films like The Incredibles . Ben Burtt , the sound designer of Star Wars and Indiana Jones fame, created the "voices" for the robots in the film.

WALL-E , in keeping with Pixar tradition, also features many in-jokes and references to other movies that Pixar's management enjoy. Directive A-113 is a reference to the classroom number in which John Lasseter, Pete Docter, Andrew Stanton, Brad Bird, and other Pixar directors studied animation. The code A113 also appears in other Pixar releases, including as the license plate for Mrs. Davis's van in the Toy Story franchise, as a door number at the Monsters Inc factory, and the number of the conference room in The Incredibles . Directive A113, however, plays a direct role in the plotline of WALL-E.

According to Box Office Mojo , WALL•E brought in $63.1 million in its opening weekend for the number one spot. This gives WALL•E the fifth best opening weekend for any Pixar film, behind Toy Story 3 ($109 million), The Incredibles ($70.5 million), Finding Nemo ($70.3 million) and Up ($68.1 million). Critical reception to the film has been very positive, with a 96% approval rating at Rotten Tomatoes .

Quick: Name five things most closely associated with science fiction… Time’s up! If “robots” isn’t on your list, you’re either from the future where artificial humanoids are nothing but mere background radiation of contemporary living, or you are, in fact, a robot yourself, masquerading in the skin of a human right now . Robots are a mainstay of the genre for good reason: They stand in as cogent symbols of humanity’s drive to create, to build, to extend its understanding of the human condition. And they carry with them all the wonder, hubris, hope and dread that that drive compels.

With sci-fi being as vogue in popular culture as ever—a seventh Star Wars and its adorable ’droids are but a few weeks away from theaters—now is the perfect time to reflect back on our favorite ’bots as represented in film. 

Isaac Asimov’s landmark collection of short stories introduced what can only be described as one of the most influential, basic set of rules in all of fiction. His Three Laws of Robotics are about the only thing that survives translation in this outrageously generic and leaden Will Smith-starring sci-fi “thriller.” Like many other entries on this list, the only reason Sonny made the cut is because his design is pretty cool, and stands as an historical record of the Apple Inc. industrial aesthetic of day. (Unlike other robots who made the cut due to a novel look, this entry was done so with the greatest possible hesitancy.) —Scott Wold

Honestly, as is the case with many of the lower-rung denizens of this list, Bubo could almost be left off with no real harm done. But it’s an owl, which is sorta unusual for the list. It’s a robot appearing in a time period not known for its technology, so there’s that. And the nostalgia many folks have for Clash of the Titans gives ol’ Bubo the right to be here. (Added bonus—along with the Kraken and all the other monsters of the film, Bubo is part of the package that represents the final effects work of Ray Harryhausen.) —Michael Burgin

As much annoyance as I have in my heart for Spielberg’s indulgent, over-long mess of a movie, I did find some enjoyment in the Mecha robots that it featured, especially Gigolo Joe (Jude Law) and Teddy (voiced by Jack Angel). I’d still pay full admission for a three-hour buddy movie featuring those two. (With all the unwanted sequels and reboots, why can’t we ever get a whimsical reenvisioning along these lines?) Falling somewhere between the West World automatons and “replicants-lite” in design, the Mecha can thank Law’s performance for cementing their presence on this list. —M.B.

Yet another Frankenstein -y tale involving brain transplant into a robotic body—with only the noblest of intention, of course!—there’s very little to recommend here other than the fairly intimidating Colossus robot himself, a nine-foot metal monster dressed like a cult leader, and a possible visual inspiration for the Sentinels in the X-Men comics. Hey, the guy does have mind-control powers and laser eyes, after all. —S.W.

Films about robots have long captured the imagination of movie goers, who may or may not believe in its existence in the not-so-distant-future. Here are the top films about these intelligent mechanical human friends... or enemies. Check it out!

When: 2004 Who: Will Smith and Bridget Moynahan What: In the not so distant future, (2035), a detective, who dislikes the rapid advancement of technology, investigates a crime that may have been caused by a robot.

When: 1982 Who: Harrison Ford and Sean Young What: In the year 2019, genetically engineered human-looking robots called replicants, are hunted down after hijacking a ship in space. Special police operative, or "Blade Runner" Rick Deckard, played by Harrison Ford, must track down the four robots in question.

When: 1987 Who: Peter Weller, Nancy Allen and Dan O'Herlihy What: A terminally wounded police officer is brought back to life as a super human/machine cyborg used to clean up the crime-ridden streets of a futuristic Detroit. Throughout the film, RoboCop is haunted by the memories of his painful past.

When: 1984 Who: Arnold Schwarzenegger and Linda Hamilton What: A relentless assassin robot called Terminator is sent from the future (2029) to kill Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton). Kyle Reese (Michael Biehn), a soldier from the bleak robot-populated future, is sent back to protect Connor.

When: 2001 Who: Haley Joel Osment, Jude Law and Frances O'Connor What: Based on Brian Aldiss' short story, "Super-Toys Last All Summer Long," science fiction drama "A.I.: Artificial Intelligence" is about a robot child who wants to be "real." David, an android who looks just like a human boy, is uniquely programmed with the ability to love.

WALL•E is set in the far future where humans have left Earth on a giant ship called the Axiom  because of all the garbage pile-up. The only known inhabits now are a robot named WALL•E , who must keep up the mess and his cockroach friend Hal . However, all that changes when WALL•E meets a robot named EVE and falls in love with her. Soon the two robots are heading into space and onto the Axiom on a mission that could bring humankind back to Earth.

Over the end credits, the restoration of Earth is depicted through pictures that evolve from rather primitive hieroglyphs to impressive paintings. As the years pass, Earth becomes as lush and green as ever, and humans have become active to the extent that they regain their former body structures. In the end, WALL•E and EVE are still together, and they observe a large tree; it is shown that this tree is the same plant  that had brought them home many years before.

WALL-E was also the first Pixar movie to feature live-action footage, which was used to give the caricatured CGI characters an appearance that suggested they had severely devolved from their ancestors who had left Earth. Much of the "fat" on these characters was modeled on baby fat and marine mammal blubber, which tends to have quiet a different appearance from the fat on an obese adult.

To get the right look of the sci-fi films of the '60s and '70s, Pixar brought in famed cinematographer Roger Deakins and ILM visual-effects guru Dennis Muren to help the Pixarians create effects like barrel distortion and lens flare. [11] These had been absent from Pixar's early releases and used only minimally in then-recent films like The Incredibles . Ben Burtt , the sound designer of Star Wars and Indiana Jones fame, created the "voices" for the robots in the film.

WALL-E , in keeping with Pixar tradition, also features many in-jokes and references to other movies that Pixar's management enjoy. Directive A-113 is a reference to the classroom number in which John Lasseter, Pete Docter, Andrew Stanton, Brad Bird, and other Pixar directors studied animation. The code A113 also appears in other Pixar releases, including as the license plate for Mrs. Davis's van in the Toy Story franchise, as a door number at the Monsters Inc factory, and the number of the conference room in The Incredibles . Directive A113, however, plays a direct role in the plotline of WALL-E.

According to Box Office Mojo , WALL•E brought in $63.1 million in its opening weekend for the number one spot. This gives WALL•E the fifth best opening weekend for any Pixar film, behind Toy Story 3 ($109 million), The Incredibles ($70.5 million), Finding Nemo ($70.3 million) and Up ($68.1 million). Critical reception to the film has been very positive, with a 96% approval rating at Rotten Tomatoes .

Films about robots have long captured the imagination of movie goers, who may or may not believe in its existence in the not-so-distant-future. Here are the top films about these intelligent mechanical human friends... or enemies. Check it out!

When: 2004 Who: Will Smith and Bridget Moynahan What: In the not so distant future, (2035), a detective, who dislikes the rapid advancement of technology, investigates a crime that may have been caused by a robot.

When: 1982 Who: Harrison Ford and Sean Young What: In the year 2019, genetically engineered human-looking robots called replicants, are hunted down after hijacking a ship in space. Special police operative, or "Blade Runner" Rick Deckard, played by Harrison Ford, must track down the four robots in question.

When: 1987 Who: Peter Weller, Nancy Allen and Dan O'Herlihy What: A terminally wounded police officer is brought back to life as a super human/machine cyborg used to clean up the crime-ridden streets of a futuristic Detroit. Throughout the film, RoboCop is haunted by the memories of his painful past.

When: 1984 Who: Arnold Schwarzenegger and Linda Hamilton What: A relentless assassin robot called Terminator is sent from the future (2029) to kill Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton). Kyle Reese (Michael Biehn), a soldier from the bleak robot-populated future, is sent back to protect Connor.

When: 2001 Who: Haley Joel Osment, Jude Law and Frances O'Connor What: Based on Brian Aldiss' short story, "Super-Toys Last All Summer Long," science fiction drama "A.I.: Artificial Intelligence" is about a robot child who wants to be "real." David, an android who looks just like a human boy, is uniquely programmed with the ability to love.


Robots (2005) - IMDb

List of fictional robots and androids - Wikipedia

    Films about robots have long captured the imagination of movie goers, who may or may not believe in its existence in the not-so-distant-future. Here are the top films about these intelligent mechanical human friends... or enemies. Check it out!When: 2004
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