Robot cartoon movie characters


Films about robots have long captured the imagination of movie goers, who may or may not believe in its existence in the not-so-distant-future. Here are the top films about these intelligent mechanical human friends... or enemies. Check it out!

When: 2004 Who: Will Smith and Bridget Moynahan What: In the not so distant future, (2035), a detective, who dislikes the rapid advancement of technology, investigates a crime that may have been caused by a robot.

When: 1982 Who: Harrison Ford and Sean Young What: In the year 2019, genetically engineered human-looking robots called replicants, are hunted down after hijacking a ship in space. Special police operative, or "Blade Runner" Rick Deckard, played by Harrison Ford, must track down the four robots in question.

When: 1987 Who: Peter Weller, Nancy Allen and Dan O'Herlihy What: A terminally wounded police officer is brought back to life as a super human/machine cyborg used to clean up the crime-ridden streets of a futuristic Detroit. Throughout the film, RoboCop is haunted by the memories of his painful past.

When: 1984 Who: Arnold Schwarzenegger and Linda Hamilton What: A relentless assassin robot called Terminator is sent from the future (2029) to kill Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton). Kyle Reese (Michael Biehn), a soldier from the bleak robot-populated future, is sent back to protect Connor.

When: 2001 Who: Haley Joel Osment, Jude Law and Frances O'Connor What: Based on Brian Aldiss' short story, "Super-Toys Last All Summer Long," science fiction drama "A.I.: Artificial Intelligence" is about a robot child who wants to be "real." David, an android who looks just like a human boy, is uniquely programmed with the ability to love.

In this familiar story with a twist (robots instead of people) there are several clearly stated messages: “Follow Your Dreams"; “Never, Never Give Up"; and “You Can Shine No Matter What You Are Made Of.” When the greedy corporation adapts the slogan “Why be you when you can be new,” the heroes counter that slogan and everyone learns the value of repairing and revitalizing the old, sturdy favorites. Themes include perseverance, courage, and compassion.

Rodney Copperbottom is a hero who is smart, loyal, compassionate, courageous, steadfast, and doesn’t give up no matter what the odds. His father’s greatest gift to him is believing in his son and letting him go out into the world to prove himself and realize his dream of making the world a better place. The two villains are greedy and care nothing for their fellow robots. Rodney has a group of friends who also prove their loyalty and individual worth.

Cartoon chases, falls, captures, and battles take place. Because all the players are robots, the most serious threat is that of being melted down in a “chop shop’s” fiery oven and turned into scrap metal. Many of the action sequences are funny in that the characters' vulnerable body parts are metal and made of a variety of ordinary objects (pots, pans, screwdrivers, utensils). The two villains, a mother and son combination, are greedy, ruthless corporate types who may look or sound scary to the very youngest viewer.

Some flirtatious behavior between two sets of characters. A very few humorous sexual references (i.e. cross dressing) that will most likely go over the heads of most youngsters.

No actual swearing or coarse language with the exception of a short sequence of farting, which includes a fart contest.  Other words used are “fanny,” “booty,” and a pun when one robot “gets screwed.”

Parents need to know that Robots has cartoon-style peril and violence with some thrill-ride-ish special effects. There's a little potty language ("booty," "fanny") plus some potty jokes, including an extended fart joke sequence. There's also some mild sexual humor, including jokes about cross-dressing and "fixing" a dog. Great messages abound about following your dreams and not giving up.

This weekend, director Neill Blomkamp adds a new member to an exclusive club: movies with really cool robots. It’s a cross-section of movies big and small that drive the story forward with characters made of metal and wire. Sometimes they’re menacing, sometimes they’re hilarious, but the best movie robots are always unforgettable.

Yes Neill Blomkamp’s latest creation is new. And no, the movie isn’t that good. But Chappie is unlike any robot you’ve ever seen, wrapping innocence and strength into one very interesting and fun package.

The Sentinels have always been a big part of the X-Men universe. I loved them in the comics and while their first major big screen incarnation was very different from their comic book origins, they were beautiful, deadly and so unbeatable that the X-Men had to change time to do triumph over them.

The spider-like like killing machines that rule over the real world in the Wachowskis’ masterpiece are both terrifying and really, really sleek. You’re scared of them, but you want to see more.

Haley Joel Osment’s David may have been the main character but it was Jude Law’s character that always made me laugh. His tangible human features and winning personality are just so perfect.

Films about robots have long captured the imagination of movie goers, who may or may not believe in its existence in the not-so-distant-future. Here are the top films about these intelligent mechanical human friends... or enemies. Check it out!

When: 2004 Who: Will Smith and Bridget Moynahan What: In the not so distant future, (2035), a detective, who dislikes the rapid advancement of technology, investigates a crime that may have been caused by a robot.

When: 1982 Who: Harrison Ford and Sean Young What: In the year 2019, genetically engineered human-looking robots called replicants, are hunted down after hijacking a ship in space. Special police operative, or "Blade Runner" Rick Deckard, played by Harrison Ford, must track down the four robots in question.

When: 1987 Who: Peter Weller, Nancy Allen and Dan O'Herlihy What: A terminally wounded police officer is brought back to life as a super human/machine cyborg used to clean up the crime-ridden streets of a futuristic Detroit. Throughout the film, RoboCop is haunted by the memories of his painful past.

When: 1984 Who: Arnold Schwarzenegger and Linda Hamilton What: A relentless assassin robot called Terminator is sent from the future (2029) to kill Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton). Kyle Reese (Michael Biehn), a soldier from the bleak robot-populated future, is sent back to protect Connor.

When: 2001 Who: Haley Joel Osment, Jude Law and Frances O'Connor What: Based on Brian Aldiss' short story, "Super-Toys Last All Summer Long," science fiction drama "A.I.: Artificial Intelligence" is about a robot child who wants to be "real." David, an android who looks just like a human boy, is uniquely programmed with the ability to love.

Films about robots have long captured the imagination of movie goers, who may or may not believe in its existence in the not-so-distant-future. Here are the top films about these intelligent mechanical human friends... or enemies. Check it out!

When: 2004 Who: Will Smith and Bridget Moynahan What: In the not so distant future, (2035), a detective, who dislikes the rapid advancement of technology, investigates a crime that may have been caused by a robot.

When: 1982 Who: Harrison Ford and Sean Young What: In the year 2019, genetically engineered human-looking robots called replicants, are hunted down after hijacking a ship in space. Special police operative, or "Blade Runner" Rick Deckard, played by Harrison Ford, must track down the four robots in question.

When: 1987 Who: Peter Weller, Nancy Allen and Dan O'Herlihy What: A terminally wounded police officer is brought back to life as a super human/machine cyborg used to clean up the crime-ridden streets of a futuristic Detroit. Throughout the film, RoboCop is haunted by the memories of his painful past.

When: 1984 Who: Arnold Schwarzenegger and Linda Hamilton What: A relentless assassin robot called Terminator is sent from the future (2029) to kill Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton). Kyle Reese (Michael Biehn), a soldier from the bleak robot-populated future, is sent back to protect Connor.

When: 2001 Who: Haley Joel Osment, Jude Law and Frances O'Connor What: Based on Brian Aldiss' short story, "Super-Toys Last All Summer Long," science fiction drama "A.I.: Artificial Intelligence" is about a robot child who wants to be "real." David, an android who looks just like a human boy, is uniquely programmed with the ability to love.

In this familiar story with a twist (robots instead of people) there are several clearly stated messages: “Follow Your Dreams"; “Never, Never Give Up"; and “You Can Shine No Matter What You Are Made Of.” When the greedy corporation adapts the slogan “Why be you when you can be new,” the heroes counter that slogan and everyone learns the value of repairing and revitalizing the old, sturdy favorites. Themes include perseverance, courage, and compassion.

Rodney Copperbottom is a hero who is smart, loyal, compassionate, courageous, steadfast, and doesn’t give up no matter what the odds. His father’s greatest gift to him is believing in his son and letting him go out into the world to prove himself and realize his dream of making the world a better place. The two villains are greedy and care nothing for their fellow robots. Rodney has a group of friends who also prove their loyalty and individual worth.

Cartoon chases, falls, captures, and battles take place. Because all the players are robots, the most serious threat is that of being melted down in a “chop shop’s” fiery oven and turned into scrap metal. Many of the action sequences are funny in that the characters' vulnerable body parts are metal and made of a variety of ordinary objects (pots, pans, screwdrivers, utensils). The two villains, a mother and son combination, are greedy, ruthless corporate types who may look or sound scary to the very youngest viewer.

Some flirtatious behavior between two sets of characters. A very few humorous sexual references (i.e. cross dressing) that will most likely go over the heads of most youngsters.

No actual swearing or coarse language with the exception of a short sequence of farting, which includes a fart contest.  Other words used are “fanny,” “booty,” and a pun when one robot “gets screwed.”

Parents need to know that Robots has cartoon-style peril and violence with some thrill-ride-ish special effects. There's a little potty language ("booty," "fanny") plus some potty jokes, including an extended fart joke sequence. There's also some mild sexual humor, including jokes about cross-dressing and "fixing" a dog. Great messages abound about following your dreams and not giving up.

Films about robots have long captured the imagination of movie goers, who may or may not believe in its existence in the not-so-distant-future. Here are the top films about these intelligent mechanical human friends... or enemies. Check it out!

When: 2004 Who: Will Smith and Bridget Moynahan What: In the not so distant future, (2035), a detective, who dislikes the rapid advancement of technology, investigates a crime that may have been caused by a robot.

When: 1982 Who: Harrison Ford and Sean Young What: In the year 2019, genetically engineered human-looking robots called replicants, are hunted down after hijacking a ship in space. Special police operative, or "Blade Runner" Rick Deckard, played by Harrison Ford, must track down the four robots in question.

When: 1987 Who: Peter Weller, Nancy Allen and Dan O'Herlihy What: A terminally wounded police officer is brought back to life as a super human/machine cyborg used to clean up the crime-ridden streets of a futuristic Detroit. Throughout the film, RoboCop is haunted by the memories of his painful past.

When: 1984 Who: Arnold Schwarzenegger and Linda Hamilton What: A relentless assassin robot called Terminator is sent from the future (2029) to kill Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton). Kyle Reese (Michael Biehn), a soldier from the bleak robot-populated future, is sent back to protect Connor.

When: 2001 Who: Haley Joel Osment, Jude Law and Frances O'Connor What: Based on Brian Aldiss' short story, "Super-Toys Last All Summer Long," science fiction drama "A.I.: Artificial Intelligence" is about a robot child who wants to be "real." David, an android who looks just like a human boy, is uniquely programmed with the ability to love.

In this familiar story with a twist (robots instead of people) there are several clearly stated messages: “Follow Your Dreams"; “Never, Never Give Up"; and “You Can Shine No Matter What You Are Made Of.” When the greedy corporation adapts the slogan “Why be you when you can be new,” the heroes counter that slogan and everyone learns the value of repairing and revitalizing the old, sturdy favorites. Themes include perseverance, courage, and compassion.

Rodney Copperbottom is a hero who is smart, loyal, compassionate, courageous, steadfast, and doesn’t give up no matter what the odds. His father’s greatest gift to him is believing in his son and letting him go out into the world to prove himself and realize his dream of making the world a better place. The two villains are greedy and care nothing for their fellow robots. Rodney has a group of friends who also prove their loyalty and individual worth.

Cartoon chases, falls, captures, and battles take place. Because all the players are robots, the most serious threat is that of being melted down in a “chop shop’s” fiery oven and turned into scrap metal. Many of the action sequences are funny in that the characters' vulnerable body parts are metal and made of a variety of ordinary objects (pots, pans, screwdrivers, utensils). The two villains, a mother and son combination, are greedy, ruthless corporate types who may look or sound scary to the very youngest viewer.

Some flirtatious behavior between two sets of characters. A very few humorous sexual references (i.e. cross dressing) that will most likely go over the heads of most youngsters.

No actual swearing or coarse language with the exception of a short sequence of farting, which includes a fart contest.  Other words used are “fanny,” “booty,” and a pun when one robot “gets screwed.”

Parents need to know that Robots has cartoon-style peril and violence with some thrill-ride-ish special effects. There's a little potty language ("booty," "fanny") plus some potty jokes, including an extended fart joke sequence. There's also some mild sexual humor, including jokes about cross-dressing and "fixing" a dog. Great messages abound about following your dreams and not giving up.

This weekend, director Neill Blomkamp adds a new member to an exclusive club: movies with really cool robots. It’s a cross-section of movies big and small that drive the story forward with characters made of metal and wire. Sometimes they’re menacing, sometimes they’re hilarious, but the best movie robots are always unforgettable.

Yes Neill Blomkamp’s latest creation is new. And no, the movie isn’t that good. But Chappie is unlike any robot you’ve ever seen, wrapping innocence and strength into one very interesting and fun package.

The Sentinels have always been a big part of the X-Men universe. I loved them in the comics and while their first major big screen incarnation was very different from their comic book origins, they were beautiful, deadly and so unbeatable that the X-Men had to change time to do triumph over them.

The spider-like like killing machines that rule over the real world in the Wachowskis’ masterpiece are both terrifying and really, really sleek. You’re scared of them, but you want to see more.

Haley Joel Osment’s David may have been the main character but it was Jude Law’s character that always made me laugh. His tangible human features and winning personality are just so perfect.

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Is there anything more validating than bonding with a friend over something obscure? Some of the best friendships began with phrases like “You watch that?!” or “You do that, too?!” Half the reason you love your favorite cousin or sibling so much is that grandma threw the same slipper at both of you; or you remember that time you both snuck into the baptism pool after Week of Prayer; or you both know that same Sisqo track by heart, because Dru Hill was the illest and Unleash the Dragon was so much more than the Thong Song. These are the things that make them your friends. They get you… in here .

Now everyone’s seen Animaniacs and Sailor Moon . Pepper Ann was known to most, and chances are you were saturated with Pokemon whether you liked it or not. Even your not-so-nerdy friends watched Tiny Toons or Tailspin , it just came with the territory of being a socially aware 5th-grader. But what about those lesser-known cartoons? That’s where the real bonding comes in.

If your mom came to wake you up for school only to find you already in front of the TV at 6am, this is for you. If you were yelled at for neglecting nutrition and homework between the hours of 3-5, this is for you. If you unrolled tin foil to attach to your antennae on a Sunday morning, this is a dedication. Come bond with me on this journey.

Actually older than Voltron , Macron 1 was one of the earlier mech-warrior animes to gain traction in the US. The US version of the show was highly edited from the original Japanese one to have a rather generic, easy-to-understand premise: a band of heroes were fighting an evil organization. But that didn’t matter because the visuals were stunning and we were just kids.

I HAD NO IDEA THIS WASN’T TRANSFORMERS. I was a child, how could I be expected to discern the two?! Just listen to the show’s description:

“A race of intelligent robots is hiding on Earth, disguising themselves as ordinary cars and motorcycles. There are two factions: the good Go-Bots and the evil Renegades. Each episode features new attempts by the Renegades to seize power from the Go-Bots.” –TV.com


List of fictional robots and androids - Wikipedia

Robots (2005) - IMDb

    Films about robots have long captured the imagination of movie goers, who may or may not believe in its existence in the not-so-distant-future. Here are the top films about these intelligent mechanical human friends... or enemies. Check it out!When: 2004
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