Robot cartoon movie for children


The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

WALL•E is set in the far future where humans have left Earth on a giant ship called the Axiom  because of all the garbage pile-up. The only known inhabits now are a robot named WALL•E , who must keep up the mess and his cockroach friend Hal . However, all that changes when WALL•E meets a robot named EVE and falls in love with her. Soon the two robots are heading into space and onto the Axiom on a mission that could bring humankind back to Earth.

Over the end credits, the restoration of Earth is depicted through pictures that evolve from rather primitive hieroglyphs to impressive paintings. As the years pass, Earth becomes as lush and green as ever, and humans have become active to the extent that they regain their former body structures. In the end, WALL•E and EVE are still together, and they observe a large tree; it is shown that this tree is the same plant  that had brought them home many years before.

WALL-E was also the first Pixar movie to feature live-action footage, which was used to give the caricatured CGI characters an appearance that suggested they had severely devolved from their ancestors who had left Earth. Much of the "fat" on these characters was modeled on baby fat and marine mammal blubber, which tends to have quiet a different appearance from the fat on an obese adult.

To get the right look of the sci-fi films of the '60s and '70s, Pixar brought in famed cinematographer Roger Deakins and ILM visual-effects guru Dennis Muren to help the Pixarians create effects like barrel distortion and lens flare. [11] These had been absent from Pixar's early releases and used only minimally in then-recent films like The Incredibles . Ben Burtt , the sound designer of Star Wars and Indiana Jones fame, created the "voices" for the robots in the film.

WALL-E , in keeping with Pixar tradition, also features many in-jokes and references to other movies that Pixar's management enjoy. Directive A-113 is a reference to the classroom number in which John Lasseter, Pete Docter, Andrew Stanton, Brad Bird, and other Pixar directors studied animation. The code A113 also appears in other Pixar releases, including as the license plate for Mrs. Davis's van in the Toy Story franchise, as a door number at the Monsters Inc factory, and the number of the conference room in The Incredibles . Directive A113, however, plays a direct role in the plotline of WALL-E.

According to Box Office Mojo , WALL•E brought in $63.1 million in its opening weekend for the number one spot. This gives WALL•E the fifth best opening weekend for any Pixar film, behind Toy Story 3 ($109 million), The Incredibles ($70.5 million), Finding Nemo ($70.3 million) and Up ($68.1 million). Critical reception to the film has been very positive, with a 96% approval rating at Rotten Tomatoes .

This weekend, director Neill Blomkamp adds a new member to an exclusive club: movies with really cool robots. It’s a cross-section of movies big and small that drive the story forward with characters made of metal and wire. Sometimes they’re menacing, sometimes they’re hilarious, but the best movie robots are always unforgettable.

Yes Neill Blomkamp’s latest creation is new. And no, the movie isn’t that good. But Chappie is unlike any robot you’ve ever seen, wrapping innocence and strength into one very interesting and fun package.

The Sentinels have always been a big part of the X-Men universe. I loved them in the comics and while their first major big screen incarnation was very different from their comic book origins, they were beautiful, deadly and so unbeatable that the X-Men had to change time to do triumph over them.

The spider-like like killing machines that rule over the real world in the Wachowskis’ masterpiece are both terrifying and really, really sleek. You’re scared of them, but you want to see more.

Haley Joel Osment’s David may have been the main character but it was Jude Law’s character that always made me laugh. His tangible human features and winning personality are just so perfect.

Cartoon Network has produced original animation since 1993, when they produced their first original series, The Moxy Show . The following is a list of shows and movies from the history of Cartoon Network. Shows that no longer air on Cartoon Network are marked with an asterisk (*) .

Cartoon Cartoons were 15 comedic-oriented Cartoon Network Original Series that premiered between 1996 and 2003. They were produced by Hanna-Barbera and Cartoon Network Studios , with smaller studios focusing on individual projects. Most Cartoon Cartoons were featured on CN's Friday night programming block, Cartoon Cartoon Fridays . What a Cartoon! was the precursor to, and launching point of several of the early Cartoon Cartoons.

The "Cartoon Cartoon" moniker was introduced in 1997 , with the introduction of Cartoon Cartoon Fridays. In 2004 , CN stopped using this moniker when referring to its original series that were still in production, but re-introduced it in 2005 to refer to their "retro" cartoons that were being re-run on The Cartoon Cartoon Top 5 and The Cartoon Cartoon Show . In 2008 , CN cancelled both programs and dropped the moniker entirely, and it is nowhere to be found on their official website. Samurai Jack is the only Cartoon Network original series produced between 1996 and 2003 that was not labeled with the Cartoon Cartoon moniker.

The last "Cartoon Cartoons" series to air on the channel was Ed, Edd n Eddy , which finished airing in November 2009.

After the Cartoon Cartoons label was dropped in the early 2000s for new series, a total of 15 series were aired from the early to mid 2000s. 2009 was the only year during this time period where no NEW cartoons were launched in favor of live-action series for CN Real .

This last cartoon to air on the channel from this era was The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack , which finished airing in August 2010.

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

WALL•E is set in the far future where humans have left Earth on a giant ship called the Axiom  because of all the garbage pile-up. The only known inhabits now are a robot named WALL•E , who must keep up the mess and his cockroach friend Hal . However, all that changes when WALL•E meets a robot named EVE and falls in love with her. Soon the two robots are heading into space and onto the Axiom on a mission that could bring humankind back to Earth.

Over the end credits, the restoration of Earth is depicted through pictures that evolve from rather primitive hieroglyphs to impressive paintings. As the years pass, Earth becomes as lush and green as ever, and humans have become active to the extent that they regain their former body structures. In the end, WALL•E and EVE are still together, and they observe a large tree; it is shown that this tree is the same plant  that had brought them home many years before.

WALL-E was also the first Pixar movie to feature live-action footage, which was used to give the caricatured CGI characters an appearance that suggested they had severely devolved from their ancestors who had left Earth. Much of the "fat" on these characters was modeled on baby fat and marine mammal blubber, which tends to have quiet a different appearance from the fat on an obese adult.

To get the right look of the sci-fi films of the '60s and '70s, Pixar brought in famed cinematographer Roger Deakins and ILM visual-effects guru Dennis Muren to help the Pixarians create effects like barrel distortion and lens flare. [11] These had been absent from Pixar's early releases and used only minimally in then-recent films like The Incredibles . Ben Burtt , the sound designer of Star Wars and Indiana Jones fame, created the "voices" for the robots in the film.

WALL-E , in keeping with Pixar tradition, also features many in-jokes and references to other movies that Pixar's management enjoy. Directive A-113 is a reference to the classroom number in which John Lasseter, Pete Docter, Andrew Stanton, Brad Bird, and other Pixar directors studied animation. The code A113 also appears in other Pixar releases, including as the license plate for Mrs. Davis's van in the Toy Story franchise, as a door number at the Monsters Inc factory, and the number of the conference room in The Incredibles . Directive A113, however, plays a direct role in the plotline of WALL-E.

According to Box Office Mojo , WALL•E brought in $63.1 million in its opening weekend for the number one spot. This gives WALL•E the fifth best opening weekend for any Pixar film, behind Toy Story 3 ($109 million), The Incredibles ($70.5 million), Finding Nemo ($70.3 million) and Up ($68.1 million). Critical reception to the film has been very positive, with a 96% approval rating at Rotten Tomatoes .

This weekend, director Neill Blomkamp adds a new member to an exclusive club: movies with really cool robots. It’s a cross-section of movies big and small that drive the story forward with characters made of metal and wire. Sometimes they’re menacing, sometimes they’re hilarious, but the best movie robots are always unforgettable.

Yes Neill Blomkamp’s latest creation is new. And no, the movie isn’t that good. But Chappie is unlike any robot you’ve ever seen, wrapping innocence and strength into one very interesting and fun package.

The Sentinels have always been a big part of the X-Men universe. I loved them in the comics and while their first major big screen incarnation was very different from their comic book origins, they were beautiful, deadly and so unbeatable that the X-Men had to change time to do triumph over them.

The spider-like like killing machines that rule over the real world in the Wachowskis’ masterpiece are both terrifying and really, really sleek. You’re scared of them, but you want to see more.

Haley Joel Osment’s David may have been the main character but it was Jude Law’s character that always made me laugh. His tangible human features and winning personality are just so perfect.

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

WALL•E is set in the far future where humans have left Earth on a giant ship called the Axiom  because of all the garbage pile-up. The only known inhabits now are a robot named WALL•E , who must keep up the mess and his cockroach friend Hal . However, all that changes when WALL•E meets a robot named EVE and falls in love with her. Soon the two robots are heading into space and onto the Axiom on a mission that could bring humankind back to Earth.

Over the end credits, the restoration of Earth is depicted through pictures that evolve from rather primitive hieroglyphs to impressive paintings. As the years pass, Earth becomes as lush and green as ever, and humans have become active to the extent that they regain their former body structures. In the end, WALL•E and EVE are still together, and they observe a large tree; it is shown that this tree is the same plant  that had brought them home many years before.

WALL-E was also the first Pixar movie to feature live-action footage, which was used to give the caricatured CGI characters an appearance that suggested they had severely devolved from their ancestors who had left Earth. Much of the "fat" on these characters was modeled on baby fat and marine mammal blubber, which tends to have quiet a different appearance from the fat on an obese adult.

To get the right look of the sci-fi films of the '60s and '70s, Pixar brought in famed cinematographer Roger Deakins and ILM visual-effects guru Dennis Muren to help the Pixarians create effects like barrel distortion and lens flare. [11] These had been absent from Pixar's early releases and used only minimally in then-recent films like The Incredibles . Ben Burtt , the sound designer of Star Wars and Indiana Jones fame, created the "voices" for the robots in the film.

WALL-E , in keeping with Pixar tradition, also features many in-jokes and references to other movies that Pixar's management enjoy. Directive A-113 is a reference to the classroom number in which John Lasseter, Pete Docter, Andrew Stanton, Brad Bird, and other Pixar directors studied animation. The code A113 also appears in other Pixar releases, including as the license plate for Mrs. Davis's van in the Toy Story franchise, as a door number at the Monsters Inc factory, and the number of the conference room in The Incredibles . Directive A113, however, plays a direct role in the plotline of WALL-E.

According to Box Office Mojo , WALL•E brought in $63.1 million in its opening weekend for the number one spot. This gives WALL•E the fifth best opening weekend for any Pixar film, behind Toy Story 3 ($109 million), The Incredibles ($70.5 million), Finding Nemo ($70.3 million) and Up ($68.1 million). Critical reception to the film has been very positive, with a 96% approval rating at Rotten Tomatoes .

The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

WALL•E is set in the far future where humans have left Earth on a giant ship called the Axiom  because of all the garbage pile-up. The only known inhabits now are a robot named WALL•E , who must keep up the mess and his cockroach friend Hal . However, all that changes when WALL•E meets a robot named EVE and falls in love with her. Soon the two robots are heading into space and onto the Axiom on a mission that could bring humankind back to Earth.

Over the end credits, the restoration of Earth is depicted through pictures that evolve from rather primitive hieroglyphs to impressive paintings. As the years pass, Earth becomes as lush and green as ever, and humans have become active to the extent that they regain their former body structures. In the end, WALL•E and EVE are still together, and they observe a large tree; it is shown that this tree is the same plant  that had brought them home many years before.

WALL-E was also the first Pixar movie to feature live-action footage, which was used to give the caricatured CGI characters an appearance that suggested they had severely devolved from their ancestors who had left Earth. Much of the "fat" on these characters was modeled on baby fat and marine mammal blubber, which tends to have quiet a different appearance from the fat on an obese adult.

To get the right look of the sci-fi films of the '60s and '70s, Pixar brought in famed cinematographer Roger Deakins and ILM visual-effects guru Dennis Muren to help the Pixarians create effects like barrel distortion and lens flare. [11] These had been absent from Pixar's early releases and used only minimally in then-recent films like The Incredibles . Ben Burtt , the sound designer of Star Wars and Indiana Jones fame, created the "voices" for the robots in the film.

WALL-E , in keeping with Pixar tradition, also features many in-jokes and references to other movies that Pixar's management enjoy. Directive A-113 is a reference to the classroom number in which John Lasseter, Pete Docter, Andrew Stanton, Brad Bird, and other Pixar directors studied animation. The code A113 also appears in other Pixar releases, including as the license plate for Mrs. Davis's van in the Toy Story franchise, as a door number at the Monsters Inc factory, and the number of the conference room in The Incredibles . Directive A113, however, plays a direct role in the plotline of WALL-E.

According to Box Office Mojo , WALL•E brought in $63.1 million in its opening weekend for the number one spot. This gives WALL•E the fifth best opening weekend for any Pixar film, behind Toy Story 3 ($109 million), The Incredibles ($70.5 million), Finding Nemo ($70.3 million) and Up ($68.1 million). Critical reception to the film has been very positive, with a 96% approval rating at Rotten Tomatoes .

This weekend, director Neill Blomkamp adds a new member to an exclusive club: movies with really cool robots. It’s a cross-section of movies big and small that drive the story forward with characters made of metal and wire. Sometimes they’re menacing, sometimes they’re hilarious, but the best movie robots are always unforgettable.

Yes Neill Blomkamp’s latest creation is new. And no, the movie isn’t that good. But Chappie is unlike any robot you’ve ever seen, wrapping innocence and strength into one very interesting and fun package.

The Sentinels have always been a big part of the X-Men universe. I loved them in the comics and while their first major big screen incarnation was very different from their comic book origins, they were beautiful, deadly and so unbeatable that the X-Men had to change time to do triumph over them.

The spider-like like killing machines that rule over the real world in the Wachowskis’ masterpiece are both terrifying and really, really sleek. You’re scared of them, but you want to see more.

Haley Joel Osment’s David may have been the main character but it was Jude Law’s character that always made me laugh. His tangible human features and winning personality are just so perfect.

Cartoon Network has produced original animation since 1993, when they produced their first original series, The Moxy Show . The following is a list of shows and movies from the history of Cartoon Network. Shows that no longer air on Cartoon Network are marked with an asterisk (*) .

Cartoon Cartoons were 15 comedic-oriented Cartoon Network Original Series that premiered between 1996 and 2003. They were produced by Hanna-Barbera and Cartoon Network Studios , with smaller studios focusing on individual projects. Most Cartoon Cartoons were featured on CN's Friday night programming block, Cartoon Cartoon Fridays . What a Cartoon! was the precursor to, and launching point of several of the early Cartoon Cartoons.

The "Cartoon Cartoon" moniker was introduced in 1997 , with the introduction of Cartoon Cartoon Fridays. In 2004 , CN stopped using this moniker when referring to its original series that were still in production, but re-introduced it in 2005 to refer to their "retro" cartoons that were being re-run on The Cartoon Cartoon Top 5 and The Cartoon Cartoon Show . In 2008 , CN cancelled both programs and dropped the moniker entirely, and it is nowhere to be found on their official website. Samurai Jack is the only Cartoon Network original series produced between 1996 and 2003 that was not labeled with the Cartoon Cartoon moniker.

The last "Cartoon Cartoons" series to air on the channel was Ed, Edd n Eddy , which finished airing in November 2009.

After the Cartoon Cartoons label was dropped in the early 2000s for new series, a total of 15 series were aired from the early to mid 2000s. 2009 was the only year during this time period where no NEW cartoons were launched in favor of live-action series for CN Real .

This last cartoon to air on the channel from this era was The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack , which finished airing in August 2010.

TV and Movie Robots. One thing that has not disappeared from the imagination and fantasies of both children and adults everywhere is the possibility of truly intelligent robots sharing the earth with us one day. This is a theme presented in most,

if not every, sci-fi film, cartoon, or live action animation that has anything to do with the notion of robots. TV and movie robots never seem to disappoint us. Even Pinocchio, a simple wooden puppet on strings, shares the same dream as that of replicants Zhora and Rachel in Blade Runner, to become a real, live human.

This recurring robot theme is used in many children cartoons, perhaps the most popular of which is the Japanese manga, “Astroboy,” later developed into a television cartoon series. Astroboy is the tremendously powerful child robot created by Doctor Tenma to replace his son Tobio, who was killed in a car accident. Set in a futuristic world where robots coexisted with humans, “Astroboy” deals with weighty moral issues that could arise from such a system: robot-hating humans, robots going berserk, and of course, robots with the ability to think and feel like a real person despite their form. Astroboy was both a TV and movie robot.

Nickelodeon channel’s X-J9 also known as Jenny Wakeman from the cartoon “My Life as a Teenage Robot” could very well be Astroboy’s Western counterpart. She is a state-of-the-art automaton designed and created by Dr. Noreen Wakeman to be Earth's protector, but despite her wide arsenal of weapons, devices and transformations, she desires nothing more than to live the life of a normal teenage girl. Jenny is one of those TV and movie robots that is waiting for her first full-length motion picture.

Other popular robots in the world of animation are Pixar’s Wall-E and Eve, who do not outwardly show signs of wanting to become human, but are apparently able to feel human emotions, like friendship and love. Twentieth Century Fox’s “Robots” is more obvious, filled with talking robot characters that have dreams, conflicts and resolutions. No less memorable are Rosie, the Jetson’s outdated but greatly endearing robot maid, and Bender, the heavy-drinking, cigar-smoking wise guy ‘bot in Matt Groening’s “Futurama,” both of whom, needless to say, exhibit extremely human-like traits.

And as real-life robots continue to evolve, so do cinematic effects. The robot theme is just as popular in live action films, which the older audience loves just as much as the younger ones.


List of fictional robots and androids - Wikipedia

Robots (2005) - IMDb

    The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It
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