Spot satellite rescue


SPOT is a GPS tracking device that uses the Globalstar satellite network to provide text messaging and GPS tracking (depending on the subscription type purchased). It has a coverage area that includes a large portion of the planet, with the exception of extreme northern and southern latitudes and parts of the Pacific Ocean. [1] SPOT is simplex and cannot receive user data.

With the purchase of a basic (annual) subscription, SPOT allows short (41 character [2] ) user-defined text messages to be sent to a list of telephone and e-mail addresses. This basic subscription also allows users to push their location to emergency services. For an additional cost, SPOT can transmit a breadcrumb trail of GPS points, which users can configure to be displayed on a custom web page. These points are transmitted every 10 minutes, but include only latitude and longitude data, no elevation/altitude is possible.

In March 2010, SPOT claimed to have successfully "helped initiate more than 550 rescues in 51 countries on land and at sea". [3]

In early 2013, a variation of the SPOT Satellite GPS Messenger called SPOT Connect was released. It allows the user to compose a custom message in real time using a smartphone.

If you are hiking out in the backcountry and you find yourself in an emergency, what do you do? You cannot pull out your cell phone and call for help if you are way outside the range of coverage. At times like these, you need a satellite messenger—a handheld transmitting device designed for sending your coordinates or short messages to family, friends, or local emergency responders.

How do you decide which of these two units to purchase? Before you can pick the right satellite messenger for your needs, it helps to know more about these handy devices and how they work. The right satellite messenger can literally be a lifesaver.

A satellite messenger is a GPS-based device built specifically for backcountry use. With it, you can transmit your coordinates along with short text messages.

While a satellite messenger is similar to a personal locator beacon (PLB), there are some important distinctions between them. A PLB is only for use in the most dire emergencies, and sends its signal straight to first responders. A satellite messenger can be used to contact friends and family, not just the authorities. You can use it for less urgent emergencies, as well as for sending trip updates.

So say for example you have sprained your ankle hiking and you want a friend to pick you up. You could make it back to your car on your own, but you simply do not want to. A PLB would not be appropriate for this situation, but a satellite messenger would be perfect for getting in contact with a friend or family member to come and get you.

Another difference between personal locator beacons and satellite messengers involves how they work. A PLB uses the military network of satellites, whereas satellite messengers work through commercial GPS (Globalstar or Iridium).

Rescue Profile: John "Swagman" Walker
Various Locations

John Walker aka Swagman is no stranger to overcoming challenging situations. As a U.S. Navy Veteran and avid hiker, Swagman loves being outside and takes on nature one hiking trail at a time with plans to conquer the Appalachian Trail in 2018.

With safety in mind, Swagman purchased his first SPOT device in 2008 after his sister persuaded him to do so—she didn’t want him to be mauled by a bear or rabid racoon. Little did he know that his SPOT device would be put to use not only once, but a total of three times over the past ten years.

SPOT is a GPS tracking device that uses the Globalstar satellite network to provide text messaging and GPS tracking (depending on the subscription type purchased). It has a coverage area that includes a large portion of the planet, with the exception of extreme northern and southern latitudes and parts of the Pacific Ocean. [1] SPOT is simplex and cannot receive user data.

With the purchase of a basic (annual) subscription, SPOT allows short (41 character [2] ) user-defined text messages to be sent to a list of telephone and e-mail addresses. This basic subscription also allows users to push their location to emergency services. For an additional cost, SPOT can transmit a breadcrumb trail of GPS points, which users can configure to be displayed on a custom web page. These points are transmitted every 10 minutes, but include only latitude and longitude data, no elevation/altitude is possible.

In March 2010, SPOT claimed to have successfully "helped initiate more than 550 rescues in 51 countries on land and at sea". [3]

In early 2013, a variation of the SPOT Satellite GPS Messenger called SPOT Connect was released. It allows the user to compose a custom message in real time using a smartphone.

If you are hiking out in the backcountry and you find yourself in an emergency, what do you do? You cannot pull out your cell phone and call for help if you are way outside the range of coverage. At times like these, you need a satellite messenger—a handheld transmitting device designed for sending your coordinates or short messages to family, friends, or local emergency responders.

How do you decide which of these two units to purchase? Before you can pick the right satellite messenger for your needs, it helps to know more about these handy devices and how they work. The right satellite messenger can literally be a lifesaver.

A satellite messenger is a GPS-based device built specifically for backcountry use. With it, you can transmit your coordinates along with short text messages.

While a satellite messenger is similar to a personal locator beacon (PLB), there are some important distinctions between them. A PLB is only for use in the most dire emergencies, and sends its signal straight to first responders. A satellite messenger can be used to contact friends and family, not just the authorities. You can use it for less urgent emergencies, as well as for sending trip updates.

So say for example you have sprained your ankle hiking and you want a friend to pick you up. You could make it back to your car on your own, but you simply do not want to. A PLB would not be appropriate for this situation, but a satellite messenger would be perfect for getting in contact with a friend or family member to come and get you.

Another difference between personal locator beacons and satellite messengers involves how they work. A PLB uses the military network of satellites, whereas satellite messengers work through commercial GPS (Globalstar or Iridium).

SPOT is a GPS tracking device that uses the Globalstar satellite network to provide text messaging and GPS tracking (depending on the subscription type purchased). It has a coverage area that includes a large portion of the planet, with the exception of extreme northern and southern latitudes and parts of the Pacific Ocean. [1] SPOT is simplex and cannot receive user data.

With the purchase of a basic (annual) subscription, SPOT allows short (41 character [2] ) user-defined text messages to be sent to a list of telephone and e-mail addresses. This basic subscription also allows users to push their location to emergency services. For an additional cost, SPOT can transmit a breadcrumb trail of GPS points, which users can configure to be displayed on a custom web page. These points are transmitted every 10 minutes, but include only latitude and longitude data, no elevation/altitude is possible.

In March 2010, SPOT claimed to have successfully "helped initiate more than 550 rescues in 51 countries on land and at sea". [3]

In early 2013, a variation of the SPOT Satellite GPS Messenger called SPOT Connect was released. It allows the user to compose a custom message in real time using a smartphone.


SPOT SATELLITE MESSENGER :: HOME PAGE

SPOT SATELLITE MESSENGER :: HOME PAGE

    SPOT is a GPS tracking device that uses the Globalstar satellite network to provide text messaging and GPS tracking (depending on the subscription type purchased). It has a coverage area that includes a large portion of the planet, with the exception
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