Strange change mattel


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Even though there may be similar toys made today, there is no way the original Thingmaker toys would have been created if it were designed today, because the surfaces of the metal molds would become very hot and small children could easily burn themselves; the U.S. Consumer Producer Safety Commission (CPSC) didn’t even exist before 1972, however, so Mattel was able to sell a ton of these to unsuspecting parents before they stopped manufacturing them in the 70s.

At the start of the Sixties, U.S. toy companies like Mattel were spending millions of dollars on advertising, mostly for the creation and broadcast of TV commercials like these, and each year that amount seemed to climb higher and higher.

In 1961, according to the Advertising Age Encyclopedia of Advertising , they were spending as much as $25 million, which was up nearly 50% from the year before, and for the next five years they would add another $8 million to their TV ad budgets, finally hitting $10 million in ad spending.

During this same time, the sale of U.S.-made toys like these soared, and the top toy companies combined for an estimated $1.3 to $2 billion in sales.

In 1961 alone, Mattel spent $2.5 million to advertise toys like Hot Wheels and the Barbie doll lines, both of which had been introduced back in 1959. They had signed a year-long contract with ABC’s “Matty’s Funday Funnies” — which aired from 1959-1961 on ABC’s Sunday afternoon schedule (and a 1960-1961 prime-time edition on Friday evenings, later moved to early Saturday nights in the fall of 1961) — to run commercials during the show, in addition to print ads that were published in toy and novelty magazines.

The Strange Change Machine concept from 1968 was first introduced years earlier, in 1963, as part of Mattel’s “Vac-U-Maker” set of toys. The Vac-U-Form, manufactured by Mattel in the early 60s, used an industrial process called “vacuum forming.”


mattel strange change toy | eBay

Strange Change Machine - Wikipedia

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