Doug unplugged lesson plan


After a five-year run of small-screen success on Nickelodeon, SpongeBob SquarePants makes his way from the bottom of the sea to the middle of the big screen. So how do you keep a theater full of kids (and adults) fidget-free when they’re used to 10-minute cartoons? You raise the stakes.

SpongeBob SquarePants is, well, a sea sponge ... who wears square pants. The walking yellow rectangle is infectiously optimistic and carefree, especially when hanging around his starfish of a best friend, Patrick. But when SpongeBob isn’t chosen to be manager of the newest Krusty Krab hamburger joint after years of dedicated service as a fry cook, he’s crushed.

Meanwhile, the miniscule but sinister Plankton is up to his old tricks again, trying to steal the secret formula for those delectable Krabby patties (and, oh yeah, rule the underworld). His plan seems to be working when SpongeBob’s boss, Mr. Krabs, is framed for stealing King Neptune’s crown. With the hamburger maestro facing certain grilling via Neptune’s flaming scepter (and every sea creature in the land of Bikini Bottom about to be put under Plankton's mind control), our Spongy hero offers to retrieve the crown and save Mr. Krabs’ life. To do so, he and Patrick must venture to Shell City, a faraway town from which (turn up the sinister reverb to read this) no one has ever returned!

Despite Mr. Krabs’ decision to not promote him, SpongeBob is willing to risk his life to save the hamburger mogul. King Neptune’s daughter, Princess Mindy, continually urges her heavy-handed father to show his subjects compassion. She intervenes to spare the life of a servant unduly sentenced, begs Neptune not to terminate Krabs and encourages SpongeBob and Patrick while they're on their dangerous mission. Ultimately, her empathy for the underwater citizens is acknowledged by King Neptune, who apologizes for his harsh ways.

“You are who you are” is heard throughout the movie, emphasizing to kids the lesson of self-acceptance and self-respect. Entire scenes (and songs) are dedicated to proving that no matter how old you are, you can make a difference. Mindy tells SpongeBob, “It doesn’t matter if you’re a kid... You've just gotta believe in yourself.”

Referring to their "Goofy Goober" obsession, SpongeBob mentions to Patrick that they “worship a dancing peanut.” Mindy tells the pair that her “mermaid magic” will transform them from boys to men. Trapped in a fish bowl, Patrick calls the glass a “wall of psychic energy.” In one scene SpongeBob is called a “wizard” and dresses (and shoots lightning bolts) accordingly.

DOUG UNPLUGGED: News 4's Doug Vaughn is fired up about the way Philadelphia Eagles fans behaved after their team's Super Bowl win.

Got that? You do not need to worry about preschoolers getting behind on their geometry skills. Preschoolers learn through their own independent play. They will learn that sticks are long, doors are rectangles, balls are spheres, and on and on and on.

Pattern blocks like this fantastic  Melissa & Doug Pattern Blocks  set, which we get a ton of use out of. Pattern blocks are great for free exploration of shapes , as well as following the design cards that are included.

My son loves muffin tin sorting , which is a great last minute boredom buster, especially if you add in chopsticks. When we set out to sort pattern blocks, my son discovered something very cool! He could make contained shapes in each cup.

This was a wonderful way for my son  to explore the relationship between the shapes and sizes . The muffin tin holds the blocks from slipping around and is the perfect size to demonstrate how small triangles, trapezoids and parallelograms fit together to form other, larger shapes. He doesn’t know it yet, but he was also exploring fractions !

If you are a teacher and have pattern blocks in one of your centers, why not add a muffin tin to the shelf? What will the kids do with it?

This is a wonderful idea! We're always exploring with our pattern blocks and we're always experimenting hands-on with fractions. Combining these two with the muffin tin is great! Hands-on makes fractions so much easier to understand.

Teaching kids awareness of human impact on the environment and inspiring them to be a part of the solution is vital to our future on this planet. For this reason, we conducted a fun, hands-on activity that simulates an oil spill and challenges kids of all ages to clean up the simulated disaster and its effect on wildlife.

How are you celebrating, or I should say, how are you educating on this national holiday promoting environmental consciousness? Earth Day came about in 1970 when Senator Gaylord Nelson was compelled by the devastation of the 1969 oil spill in Santa Barbara, California to force environmental protection into the political spotlight.  The ravages of an oil spill are far-reaching and really highlight the effect people can have on our world. Let’s get back to what inspired the movement and creation of Earth Day and clean up an oil spill!

The following supplies are used to complete this activity. Quantities of each item will vary based upon your needs. For detailed information on the supplies used in our classroom setting and where to find them, visit our blog post here .

Each group will need to clean up “oil” from a simulated oil spill disaster that includes feathers to represent marine life. The learning objective is to increase understanding of an oil spill disaster and environmental consequences.  This activity is a great Life Sciences challenge that also incorporates engineering and math concepts.

To set the stage for your students, begin with a discussion about the BP Oil Spill disaster in 2010– the largest accidental ocean oil spill on record. Pictures of the effects on marine plants and animals as a result of the oil spill can help the students connect the real-world application to the challenge.

For an extended explanation about using this product in your classroom along with tips, please see our related post on our website .

After a five-year run of small-screen success on Nickelodeon, SpongeBob SquarePants makes his way from the bottom of the sea to the middle of the big screen. So how do you keep a theater full of kids (and adults) fidget-free when they’re used to 10-minute cartoons? You raise the stakes.

SpongeBob SquarePants is, well, a sea sponge ... who wears square pants. The walking yellow rectangle is infectiously optimistic and carefree, especially when hanging around his starfish of a best friend, Patrick. But when SpongeBob isn’t chosen to be manager of the newest Krusty Krab hamburger joint after years of dedicated service as a fry cook, he’s crushed.

Meanwhile, the miniscule but sinister Plankton is up to his old tricks again, trying to steal the secret formula for those delectable Krabby patties (and, oh yeah, rule the underworld). His plan seems to be working when SpongeBob’s boss, Mr. Krabs, is framed for stealing King Neptune’s crown. With the hamburger maestro facing certain grilling via Neptune’s flaming scepter (and every sea creature in the land of Bikini Bottom about to be put under Plankton's mind control), our Spongy hero offers to retrieve the crown and save Mr. Krabs’ life. To do so, he and Patrick must venture to Shell City, a faraway town from which (turn up the sinister reverb to read this) no one has ever returned!

Despite Mr. Krabs’ decision to not promote him, SpongeBob is willing to risk his life to save the hamburger mogul. King Neptune’s daughter, Princess Mindy, continually urges her heavy-handed father to show his subjects compassion. She intervenes to spare the life of a servant unduly sentenced, begs Neptune not to terminate Krabs and encourages SpongeBob and Patrick while they're on their dangerous mission. Ultimately, her empathy for the underwater citizens is acknowledged by King Neptune, who apologizes for his harsh ways.

“You are who you are” is heard throughout the movie, emphasizing to kids the lesson of self-acceptance and self-respect. Entire scenes (and songs) are dedicated to proving that no matter how old you are, you can make a difference. Mindy tells SpongeBob, “It doesn’t matter if you’re a kid... You've just gotta believe in yourself.”

Referring to their "Goofy Goober" obsession, SpongeBob mentions to Patrick that they “worship a dancing peanut.” Mindy tells the pair that her “mermaid magic” will transform them from boys to men. Trapped in a fish bowl, Patrick calls the glass a “wall of psychic energy.” In one scene SpongeBob is called a “wizard” and dresses (and shoots lightning bolts) accordingly.

DOUG UNPLUGGED: News 4's Doug Vaughn is fired up about the way Philadelphia Eagles fans behaved after their team's Super Bowl win.

Got that? You do not need to worry about preschoolers getting behind on their geometry skills. Preschoolers learn through their own independent play. They will learn that sticks are long, doors are rectangles, balls are spheres, and on and on and on.

Pattern blocks like this fantastic  Melissa & Doug Pattern Blocks  set, which we get a ton of use out of. Pattern blocks are great for free exploration of shapes , as well as following the design cards that are included.

My son loves muffin tin sorting , which is a great last minute boredom buster, especially if you add in chopsticks. When we set out to sort pattern blocks, my son discovered something very cool! He could make contained shapes in each cup.

This was a wonderful way for my son  to explore the relationship between the shapes and sizes . The muffin tin holds the blocks from slipping around and is the perfect size to demonstrate how small triangles, trapezoids and parallelograms fit together to form other, larger shapes. He doesn’t know it yet, but he was also exploring fractions !

If you are a teacher and have pattern blocks in one of your centers, why not add a muffin tin to the shelf? What will the kids do with it?

This is a wonderful idea! We're always exploring with our pattern blocks and we're always experimenting hands-on with fractions. Combining these two with the muffin tin is great! Hands-on makes fractions so much easier to understand.

Teaching kids awareness of human impact on the environment and inspiring them to be a part of the solution is vital to our future on this planet. For this reason, we conducted a fun, hands-on activity that simulates an oil spill and challenges kids of all ages to clean up the simulated disaster and its effect on wildlife.

How are you celebrating, or I should say, how are you educating on this national holiday promoting environmental consciousness? Earth Day came about in 1970 when Senator Gaylord Nelson was compelled by the devastation of the 1969 oil spill in Santa Barbara, California to force environmental protection into the political spotlight.  The ravages of an oil spill are far-reaching and really highlight the effect people can have on our world. Let’s get back to what inspired the movement and creation of Earth Day and clean up an oil spill!

The following supplies are used to complete this activity. Quantities of each item will vary based upon your needs. For detailed information on the supplies used in our classroom setting and where to find them, visit our blog post here .

Each group will need to clean up “oil” from a simulated oil spill disaster that includes feathers to represent marine life. The learning objective is to increase understanding of an oil spill disaster and environmental consequences.  This activity is a great Life Sciences challenge that also incorporates engineering and math concepts.

To set the stage for your students, begin with a discussion about the BP Oil Spill disaster in 2010– the largest accidental ocean oil spill on record. Pictures of the effects on marine plants and animals as a result of the oil spill can help the students connect the real-world application to the challenge.

For an extended explanation about using this product in your classroom along with tips, please see our related post on our website .

Doug Unplugged Written and Illustrated by Dan Yaccarino Published in 2013 by Knopf ISBN 978-0375866432. Grades 1 and Up. Book Review Doug is a robot.

01.01.2013  · Doug Unplugged has 942 ratings and 205 reviews. Kathryn said: Wonderful! I love how this shows that we need more than …

Reader and Task Considerations. What do you want your students to accomplish with the text, and how will you implement this in your lesson ? How will you guide your ...

09.05.2016  · Join Doug in this great adventure! You can read along with us with YOUR copy of Dan Yaccarino's " Doug Unplugged '!

07.04.2013  · Yaccarino has written an adorable picture book called Doug Unplugged about a robot who is tired of downloading information day after day, ...

05.10.2017  · doug masnaghetti 1,016 views. 26:31. Eric Clapton ... Old Love Unplugged Guitar Lesson - Eric Clapton - All Rhythm Guitar Parts - Duration: 6:44.

After a five-year run of small-screen success on Nickelodeon, SpongeBob SquarePants makes his way from the bottom of the sea to the middle of the big screen. So how do you keep a theater full of kids (and adults) fidget-free when they’re used to 10-minute cartoons? You raise the stakes.

SpongeBob SquarePants is, well, a sea sponge ... who wears square pants. The walking yellow rectangle is infectiously optimistic and carefree, especially when hanging around his starfish of a best friend, Patrick. But when SpongeBob isn’t chosen to be manager of the newest Krusty Krab hamburger joint after years of dedicated service as a fry cook, he’s crushed.

Meanwhile, the miniscule but sinister Plankton is up to his old tricks again, trying to steal the secret formula for those delectable Krabby patties (and, oh yeah, rule the underworld). His plan seems to be working when SpongeBob’s boss, Mr. Krabs, is framed for stealing King Neptune’s crown. With the hamburger maestro facing certain grilling via Neptune’s flaming scepter (and every sea creature in the land of Bikini Bottom about to be put under Plankton's mind control), our Spongy hero offers to retrieve the crown and save Mr. Krabs’ life. To do so, he and Patrick must venture to Shell City, a faraway town from which (turn up the sinister reverb to read this) no one has ever returned!

Despite Mr. Krabs’ decision to not promote him, SpongeBob is willing to risk his life to save the hamburger mogul. King Neptune’s daughter, Princess Mindy, continually urges her heavy-handed father to show his subjects compassion. She intervenes to spare the life of a servant unduly sentenced, begs Neptune not to terminate Krabs and encourages SpongeBob and Patrick while they're on their dangerous mission. Ultimately, her empathy for the underwater citizens is acknowledged by King Neptune, who apologizes for his harsh ways.

“You are who you are” is heard throughout the movie, emphasizing to kids the lesson of self-acceptance and self-respect. Entire scenes (and songs) are dedicated to proving that no matter how old you are, you can make a difference. Mindy tells SpongeBob, “It doesn’t matter if you’re a kid... You've just gotta believe in yourself.”

Referring to their "Goofy Goober" obsession, SpongeBob mentions to Patrick that they “worship a dancing peanut.” Mindy tells the pair that her “mermaid magic” will transform them from boys to men. Trapped in a fish bowl, Patrick calls the glass a “wall of psychic energy.” In one scene SpongeBob is called a “wizard” and dresses (and shoots lightning bolts) accordingly.

DOUG UNPLUGGED: News 4's Doug Vaughn is fired up about the way Philadelphia Eagles fans behaved after their team's Super Bowl win.

After a five-year run of small-screen success on Nickelodeon, SpongeBob SquarePants makes his way from the bottom of the sea to the middle of the big screen. So how do you keep a theater full of kids (and adults) fidget-free when they’re used to 10-minute cartoons? You raise the stakes.

SpongeBob SquarePants is, well, a sea sponge ... who wears square pants. The walking yellow rectangle is infectiously optimistic and carefree, especially when hanging around his starfish of a best friend, Patrick. But when SpongeBob isn’t chosen to be manager of the newest Krusty Krab hamburger joint after years of dedicated service as a fry cook, he’s crushed.

Meanwhile, the miniscule but sinister Plankton is up to his old tricks again, trying to steal the secret formula for those delectable Krabby patties (and, oh yeah, rule the underworld). His plan seems to be working when SpongeBob’s boss, Mr. Krabs, is framed for stealing King Neptune’s crown. With the hamburger maestro facing certain grilling via Neptune’s flaming scepter (and every sea creature in the land of Bikini Bottom about to be put under Plankton's mind control), our Spongy hero offers to retrieve the crown and save Mr. Krabs’ life. To do so, he and Patrick must venture to Shell City, a faraway town from which (turn up the sinister reverb to read this) no one has ever returned!

Despite Mr. Krabs’ decision to not promote him, SpongeBob is willing to risk his life to save the hamburger mogul. King Neptune’s daughter, Princess Mindy, continually urges her heavy-handed father to show his subjects compassion. She intervenes to spare the life of a servant unduly sentenced, begs Neptune not to terminate Krabs and encourages SpongeBob and Patrick while they're on their dangerous mission. Ultimately, her empathy for the underwater citizens is acknowledged by King Neptune, who apologizes for his harsh ways.

“You are who you are” is heard throughout the movie, emphasizing to kids the lesson of self-acceptance and self-respect. Entire scenes (and songs) are dedicated to proving that no matter how old you are, you can make a difference. Mindy tells SpongeBob, “It doesn’t matter if you’re a kid... You've just gotta believe in yourself.”

Referring to their "Goofy Goober" obsession, SpongeBob mentions to Patrick that they “worship a dancing peanut.” Mindy tells the pair that her “mermaid magic” will transform them from boys to men. Trapped in a fish bowl, Patrick calls the glass a “wall of psychic energy.” In one scene SpongeBob is called a “wizard” and dresses (and shoots lightning bolts) accordingly.

After a five-year run of small-screen success on Nickelodeon, SpongeBob SquarePants makes his way from the bottom of the sea to the middle of the big screen. So how do you keep a theater full of kids (and adults) fidget-free when they’re used to 10-minute cartoons? You raise the stakes.

SpongeBob SquarePants is, well, a sea sponge ... who wears square pants. The walking yellow rectangle is infectiously optimistic and carefree, especially when hanging around his starfish of a best friend, Patrick. But when SpongeBob isn’t chosen to be manager of the newest Krusty Krab hamburger joint after years of dedicated service as a fry cook, he’s crushed.

Meanwhile, the miniscule but sinister Plankton is up to his old tricks again, trying to steal the secret formula for those delectable Krabby patties (and, oh yeah, rule the underworld). His plan seems to be working when SpongeBob’s boss, Mr. Krabs, is framed for stealing King Neptune’s crown. With the hamburger maestro facing certain grilling via Neptune’s flaming scepter (and every sea creature in the land of Bikini Bottom about to be put under Plankton's mind control), our Spongy hero offers to retrieve the crown and save Mr. Krabs’ life. To do so, he and Patrick must venture to Shell City, a faraway town from which (turn up the sinister reverb to read this) no one has ever returned!

Despite Mr. Krabs’ decision to not promote him, SpongeBob is willing to risk his life to save the hamburger mogul. King Neptune’s daughter, Princess Mindy, continually urges her heavy-handed father to show his subjects compassion. She intervenes to spare the life of a servant unduly sentenced, begs Neptune not to terminate Krabs and encourages SpongeBob and Patrick while they're on their dangerous mission. Ultimately, her empathy for the underwater citizens is acknowledged by King Neptune, who apologizes for his harsh ways.

“You are who you are” is heard throughout the movie, emphasizing to kids the lesson of self-acceptance and self-respect. Entire scenes (and songs) are dedicated to proving that no matter how old you are, you can make a difference. Mindy tells SpongeBob, “It doesn’t matter if you’re a kid... You've just gotta believe in yourself.”

Referring to their "Goofy Goober" obsession, SpongeBob mentions to Patrick that they “worship a dancing peanut.” Mindy tells the pair that her “mermaid magic” will transform them from boys to men. Trapped in a fish bowl, Patrick calls the glass a “wall of psychic energy.” In one scene SpongeBob is called a “wizard” and dresses (and shoots lightning bolts) accordingly.

DOUG UNPLUGGED: News 4's Doug Vaughn is fired up about the way Philadelphia Eagles fans behaved after their team's Super Bowl win.

Got that? You do not need to worry about preschoolers getting behind on their geometry skills. Preschoolers learn through their own independent play. They will learn that sticks are long, doors are rectangles, balls are spheres, and on and on and on.

Pattern blocks like this fantastic  Melissa & Doug Pattern Blocks  set, which we get a ton of use out of. Pattern blocks are great for free exploration of shapes , as well as following the design cards that are included.

My son loves muffin tin sorting , which is a great last minute boredom buster, especially if you add in chopsticks. When we set out to sort pattern blocks, my son discovered something very cool! He could make contained shapes in each cup.

This was a wonderful way for my son  to explore the relationship between the shapes and sizes . The muffin tin holds the blocks from slipping around and is the perfect size to demonstrate how small triangles, trapezoids and parallelograms fit together to form other, larger shapes. He doesn’t know it yet, but he was also exploring fractions !

If you are a teacher and have pattern blocks in one of your centers, why not add a muffin tin to the shelf? What will the kids do with it?

This is a wonderful idea! We're always exploring with our pattern blocks and we're always experimenting hands-on with fractions. Combining these two with the muffin tin is great! Hands-on makes fractions so much easier to understand.


John Prine | Three Chord Guitar

Unplugged (Alice in Chains album) - Wikipedia

    After a five-year run of small-screen success on Nickelodeon, SpongeBob SquarePants makes his way from the bottom of the sea to the middle of the big screen. So how do you keep a theater full of kids (and adults) fidget-free when they’re used to 10-minute
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