Doug unplugged author


Screens. The average American child spends a great deal of time in front of them—televisions, computers, phones, iPads, handheld electronic gadgets. In author/illustrator Dan Yaccarino's latest picture book,  Doug Unplugged , the average American child is Doug. And Doug is a robot. 

Every morning Doug is plugged in and filled with lots and lots of facts. His parents, who love him very much and "want him to be the smartest robot ever," manage this. "Today you will be learning all about the city," his mom tells him. "Happy downloading," says his dad. With briefcases in hand, they head to work. 

On a busy spread, displaying a computer grid and city facts (about fire engines, taxis, subways, population figures, etc.), Doug sits, staring straight ahead, and lets the downloading fill his mind. But what's that at the window? A pigeon catches his eye. 

"Doug had just learned that pigeons traveled in groups called flocks," Yaccarino writes, "but he didn't know they made such a funny cooing sound!" Aha. Herein lies the crux of this story, the notion of children learning about the world by exploring it with their very own senses, not merely passively learning about it, while seated and, more often than not, staring at a screen. 

He flies out the window—those jetpacks are handy, you know—and learns that pigeons scatter if you fly right at them, subway trains are loud, the view from the top of a skyscraper is dreamy, wet cement feels squishy, garbage cans are smelly, and much, much more. 

Doug is really stumped when a human child (Yaccarino's world here, if you look closely, is populated with both robots and humans) asks him to play at the playground. His well-meaning parents had taught him a lot and dutifully plugged him in on a daily basis, but playing was a topic about which Doug knew nothing. He is more than happy to learn, though, and engages in all sorts of play and learns how wonderful it is to have a friend.  

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Is the dust jacket of a book worth holding on to? Consider its form, its function, and its beauty. Learn more about dust jackets and their importance to your collection.

Screens. The average American child spends a great deal of time in front of them—televisions, computers, phones, iPads, handheld electronic gadgets. In author/illustrator Dan Yaccarino's latest picture book,  Doug Unplugged , the average American child is Doug. And Doug is a robot. 

Every morning Doug is plugged in and filled with lots and lots of facts. His parents, who love him very much and "want him to be the smartest robot ever," manage this. "Today you will be learning all about the city," his mom tells him. "Happy downloading," says his dad. With briefcases in hand, they head to work. 

On a busy spread, displaying a computer grid and city facts (about fire engines, taxis, subways, population figures, etc.), Doug sits, staring straight ahead, and lets the downloading fill his mind. But what's that at the window? A pigeon catches his eye. 

"Doug had just learned that pigeons traveled in groups called flocks," Yaccarino writes, "but he didn't know they made such a funny cooing sound!" Aha. Herein lies the crux of this story, the notion of children learning about the world by exploring it with their very own senses, not merely passively learning about it, while seated and, more often than not, staring at a screen. 

He flies out the window—those jetpacks are handy, you know—and learns that pigeons scatter if you fly right at them, subway trains are loud, the view from the top of a skyscraper is dreamy, wet cement feels squishy, garbage cans are smelly, and much, much more. 

Doug is really stumped when a human child (Yaccarino's world here, if you look closely, is populated with both robots and humans) asks him to play at the playground. His well-meaning parents had taught him a lot and dutifully plugged him in on a daily basis, but playing was a topic about which Doug knew nothing. He is more than happy to learn, though, and engages in all sorts of play and learns how wonderful it is to have a friend.  

Aleister Crowley was a well-known and highly controversial figure in the first half of the 20th Century. A writer, occultist, magician, and mountaineer, Crowley impacted a diverse collection of sub-cultures and interests. See collectible Crowley from Biblio booksellers .

Is the dust jacket of a book worth holding on to? Consider its form, its function, and its beauty. Learn more about dust jackets and their importance to your collection.

Doug is a robot. His parents want him to be smart, so each morning they plug him in and start the information download. After a morning spent learning facts about the city, Doug suspects he could learn even more about the city by going outside and exploring it. And so Doug . . unplugs. What follows is an exciting day of adventure and discovery. Doug learns amazing things by doing and seeing and touching and listening—and above all, by interacting with a new friend.

Dan Yaccarino's funny story of robot rebellion is a great reminder that sometimes the best way to learn about the world is to go out and be in it.

Screens. The average American child spends a great deal of time in front of them—televisions, computers, phones, iPads, handheld electronic gadgets. In author/illustrator Dan Yaccarino's latest picture book,  Doug Unplugged , the average American child is Doug. And Doug is a robot. 

Every morning Doug is plugged in and filled with lots and lots of facts. His parents, who love him very much and "want him to be the smartest robot ever," manage this. "Today you will be learning all about the city," his mom tells him. "Happy downloading," says his dad. With briefcases in hand, they head to work. 

On a busy spread, displaying a computer grid and city facts (about fire engines, taxis, subways, population figures, etc.), Doug sits, staring straight ahead, and lets the downloading fill his mind. But what's that at the window? A pigeon catches his eye. 

"Doug had just learned that pigeons traveled in groups called flocks," Yaccarino writes, "but he didn't know they made such a funny cooing sound!" Aha. Herein lies the crux of this story, the notion of children learning about the world by exploring it with their very own senses, not merely passively learning about it, while seated and, more often than not, staring at a screen. 

He flies out the window—those jetpacks are handy, you know—and learns that pigeons scatter if you fly right at them, subway trains are loud, the view from the top of a skyscraper is dreamy, wet cement feels squishy, garbage cans are smelly, and much, much more. 

Doug is really stumped when a human child (Yaccarino's world here, if you look closely, is populated with both robots and humans) asks him to play at the playground. His well-meaning parents had taught him a lot and dutifully plugged him in on a daily basis, but playing was a topic about which Doug knew nothing. He is more than happy to learn, though, and engages in all sorts of play and learns how wonderful it is to have a friend.  


Doug Unplugged – Knight Writer - kingservant.com

Doug Unplugged by Dan Yaccarino - amazon.com

    Screens. The average American child spends a great deal of time in front of them—televisions, computers, phones, iPads, handheld electronic gadgets. In author/illustrator Dan Yaccarinos latest picture book,  Doug Unplugged , the average
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