Edgar holloway and friends: an artist's collection of prints from the thirties


Holloway was born in Bradford , Yorkshire . He became a war artist during the Boer War . He excelled in military uniform portraits and he worked extensively for Gale and Polden producing military uniform pictures for their postcard series. His illustrations have subsequently been reprinted in books on British army uniforms . [1]

Holloway contributed illustrations to the Boy's Own Paper and Young England magazine and illustrated numerous children's books - mostly adventure books for boys. In 1911 he was living at 35 Milton Road, Hanwell , Middlesex, with his wife Mildred Kate Holloway, son Francis Gilbert Holloway (18) and daughter Leila Mildred Holloway (14). His occupation was stated as painter artist. [2]

Holloway emigrated to Australia in 1930 and illustrated a number of books for the Cornstalk Publishing Company in Sydney . He died in the Sydney suburb of Burwood , in 1941. [3]

Born in May 1914 in Mexborough, near Doncaster, the son of a Yorkshire miner-turned-pictureframer, he left school at 14 to travel the countryside in pursuit of subjects for watercolours and etchings. Within a year, he was etching and printing copper plates to sell through his father’s shop. His father went to extraordinary lengths to facilitate his success, procuring letters of introduction and moving his family to London. By the age of 20, Holloway had staged two critically acclaimed solo exhibitions in London; his sitters for portraits includedT. S. Eliot, Herbert Read and Stephen Spender, and his works were purchased by the British Museum, V&A and other leading collections.

When Holloway was 10, his father enrolled him on a correspondence course; later, he purchased an etching press and organised sketching trips.

With copper plates and needle, Holloway ventured into the countryside in search of commercial subjects: popular landmarks, cathedrals, castles and natural prospects. Back in the studio, he followed Ernest Lumsden’s seminal The Art of Etching (1924). In 1931, Lumsden purchased several etchings and invited the 17-year-old Holloway to become a member of the Society of Artist Printers in Edinburgh. Holloway’s work attracted the attention of influential curators such as Campbell Dodgson, MartinHardie and Malcolm Salaman, and the etchers Muirhead Bone, Francis Dodd, James McBey and Joseph Webb, with whom Holloway exchanged views on art and technique.

During the 1920s there had been an unprecedented demand for contemporary etchings, though Holloway arrived too late to enjoy the best of the market and prosper from the available opportunities. With little steady income, the family moved to Harrow then, in spring 1933, back to Doncaster.

Holloway returned to London in January 1934 and made his living selling watercolours and prints and seeking portrait commissions.

It is as an etcher of portraits that Holloway is best remembered, for nowhere is his keen observation and technical virtuosity more evident.

Holloway was born in Bradford , Yorkshire . He became a war artist during the Boer War . He excelled in military uniform portraits and he worked extensively for Gale and Polden producing military uniform pictures for their postcard series. His illustrations have subsequently been reprinted in books on British army uniforms . [1]

Holloway contributed illustrations to the Boy's Own Paper and Young England magazine and illustrated numerous children's books - mostly adventure books for boys. In 1911 he was living at 35 Milton Road, Hanwell , Middlesex, with his wife Mildred Kate Holloway, son Francis Gilbert Holloway (18) and daughter Leila Mildred Holloway (14). His occupation was stated as painter artist. [2]

Holloway emigrated to Australia in 1930 and illustrated a number of books for the Cornstalk Publishing Company in Sydney . He died in the Sydney suburb of Burwood , in 1941. [3]

Born in May 1914 in Mexborough, near Doncaster, the son of a Yorkshire miner-turned-pictureframer, he left school at 14 to travel the countryside in pursuit of subjects for watercolours and etchings. Within a year, he was etching and printing copper plates to sell through his father’s shop. His father went to extraordinary lengths to facilitate his success, procuring letters of introduction and moving his family to London. By the age of 20, Holloway had staged two critically acclaimed solo exhibitions in London; his sitters for portraits includedT. S. Eliot, Herbert Read and Stephen Spender, and his works were purchased by the British Museum, V&A and other leading collections.

When Holloway was 10, his father enrolled him on a correspondence course; later, he purchased an etching press and organised sketching trips.

With copper plates and needle, Holloway ventured into the countryside in search of commercial subjects: popular landmarks, cathedrals, castles and natural prospects. Back in the studio, he followed Ernest Lumsden’s seminal The Art of Etching (1924). In 1931, Lumsden purchased several etchings and invited the 17-year-old Holloway to become a member of the Society of Artist Printers in Edinburgh. Holloway’s work attracted the attention of influential curators such as Campbell Dodgson, MartinHardie and Malcolm Salaman, and the etchers Muirhead Bone, Francis Dodd, James McBey and Joseph Webb, with whom Holloway exchanged views on art and technique.

During the 1920s there had been an unprecedented demand for contemporary etchings, though Holloway arrived too late to enjoy the best of the market and prosper from the available opportunities. With little steady income, the family moved to Harrow then, in spring 1933, back to Doncaster.

Holloway returned to London in January 1934 and made his living selling watercolours and prints and seeking portrait commissions.

It is as an etcher of portraits that Holloway is best remembered, for nowhere is his keen observation and technical virtuosity more evident.

2018 has started with quite a few injuries and issues. As per usual, this has meant some great fights falling apart at the last minute. Unfortunately, this time it’s one we have all been looking forward to seeing…

Fighting out of Waianae, Hawaii, Max Holloway has come of age in his recent UFC career. The current featherweight champion holds the longest win streak in featherweight history and doesn’t look to be slowing down.

After a duo of TKO wins against the legend Jose Aldo, Holloway’s status as a pound-for-pound champion was cemented. Another huge fight was booked, against ex-lightweight champion Frankie Edgar.

Sadly, it seems Holloway has been injured and is now unable to continue camp for the March 3rd clash with ‘The Answer.’ Numerous reports have surfaced across the web, the most respectable being from ESPN.com.

This isn’t the only bad news for Holloway. USADA is starting to crack down on big weight cuts before fights. This means the featherweight champion might be forced to jump up to lightweight for his next fight.

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Edgar Holloway
by Edgar Holloway
1932
NPG 6893

Holloway was born in Bradford , Yorkshire . He became a war artist during the Boer War . He excelled in military uniform portraits and he worked extensively for Gale and Polden producing military uniform pictures for their postcard series. His illustrations have subsequently been reprinted in books on British army uniforms . [1]

Holloway contributed illustrations to the Boy's Own Paper and Young England magazine and illustrated numerous children's books - mostly adventure books for boys. In 1911 he was living at 35 Milton Road, Hanwell , Middlesex, with his wife Mildred Kate Holloway, son Francis Gilbert Holloway (18) and daughter Leila Mildred Holloway (14). His occupation was stated as painter artist. [2]

Holloway emigrated to Australia in 1930 and illustrated a number of books for the Cornstalk Publishing Company in Sydney . He died in the Sydney suburb of Burwood , in 1941. [3]

Born in May 1914 in Mexborough, near Doncaster, the son of a Yorkshire miner-turned-pictureframer, he left school at 14 to travel the countryside in pursuit of subjects for watercolours and etchings. Within a year, he was etching and printing copper plates to sell through his father’s shop. His father went to extraordinary lengths to facilitate his success, procuring letters of introduction and moving his family to London. By the age of 20, Holloway had staged two critically acclaimed solo exhibitions in London; his sitters for portraits includedT. S. Eliot, Herbert Read and Stephen Spender, and his works were purchased by the British Museum, V&A and other leading collections.

When Holloway was 10, his father enrolled him on a correspondence course; later, he purchased an etching press and organised sketching trips.

With copper plates and needle, Holloway ventured into the countryside in search of commercial subjects: popular landmarks, cathedrals, castles and natural prospects. Back in the studio, he followed Ernest Lumsden’s seminal The Art of Etching (1924). In 1931, Lumsden purchased several etchings and invited the 17-year-old Holloway to become a member of the Society of Artist Printers in Edinburgh. Holloway’s work attracted the attention of influential curators such as Campbell Dodgson, MartinHardie and Malcolm Salaman, and the etchers Muirhead Bone, Francis Dodd, James McBey and Joseph Webb, with whom Holloway exchanged views on art and technique.

During the 1920s there had been an unprecedented demand for contemporary etchings, though Holloway arrived too late to enjoy the best of the market and prosper from the available opportunities. With little steady income, the family moved to Harrow then, in spring 1933, back to Doncaster.

Holloway returned to London in January 1934 and made his living selling watercolours and prints and seeking portrait commissions.

It is as an etcher of portraits that Holloway is best remembered, for nowhere is his keen observation and technical virtuosity more evident.

2018 has started with quite a few injuries and issues. As per usual, this has meant some great fights falling apart at the last minute. Unfortunately, this time it’s one we have all been looking forward to seeing…

Fighting out of Waianae, Hawaii, Max Holloway has come of age in his recent UFC career. The current featherweight champion holds the longest win streak in featherweight history and doesn’t look to be slowing down.

After a duo of TKO wins against the legend Jose Aldo, Holloway’s status as a pound-for-pound champion was cemented. Another huge fight was booked, against ex-lightweight champion Frankie Edgar.

Sadly, it seems Holloway has been injured and is now unable to continue camp for the March 3rd clash with ‘The Answer.’ Numerous reports have surfaced across the web, the most respectable being from ESPN.com.

This isn’t the only bad news for Holloway. USADA is starting to crack down on big weight cuts before fights. This means the featherweight champion might be forced to jump up to lightweight for his next fight.

Holloway was born in Bradford , Yorkshire . He became a war artist during the Boer War . He excelled in military uniform portraits and he worked extensively for Gale and Polden producing military uniform pictures for their postcard series. His illustrations have subsequently been reprinted in books on British army uniforms . [1]

Holloway contributed illustrations to the Boy's Own Paper and Young England magazine and illustrated numerous children's books - mostly adventure books for boys. In 1911 he was living at 35 Milton Road, Hanwell , Middlesex, with his wife Mildred Kate Holloway, son Francis Gilbert Holloway (18) and daughter Leila Mildred Holloway (14). His occupation was stated as painter artist. [2]

Holloway emigrated to Australia in 1930 and illustrated a number of books for the Cornstalk Publishing Company in Sydney . He died in the Sydney suburb of Burwood , in 1941. [3]


Obituary: Edgar Holloway | Art and design | The Guardian

Edgar Holloway - Telegraph

    Holloway was born in Bradford , Yorkshire . He became a war artist during the Boer War . He excelled in military uniform portraits and he worked extensively for Gale and Polden producing military uniform pictures for their postcard series. His
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