The dream of the stone


Dream of the Red Chamber, also called The Story of the Stone , composed by Cao Xueqin, is one of China's Four Great Classical Novels. It was written sometime in the ...

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The Dreamstone is an English animated television series that ran for 4 series of 13 episodes each between 1990 and 1995. The original concept and artwork were created ...

22.12.2017  · Someone is following Sarah Lucas. When she peers down from her apartment window late one night, she sees him hovering in …

Browse and Read The Dream Of The Stone The Dream Of The Stone Reading is a hobby to open the knowledge windows. Besides, it can provide the inspiration and spirit to ...

THE DREAM OF THE STONE .PDF - 1013AAB15594F7B92391997A6BC307FD THE DREAM OF THE STONE Jana Vogel If you might be interested to read this The Dream Of The Stone

The death of the elderly Chinese scholar Zhou Ruchang, noted recently in a Daily Telegraph obituary, draws attention to a startling fact: that China’s greatest work of literature, the 18th-century novel Dream of the Red Chamber, on which Professor Zhou was an acknowledged – and somewhat obsessive – expert, is still virtually unknown in the English-speaking world. And yet a complete and highly readable English translation has been available in Penguin Classics for nearly 30 years.

In its native land, The Story of the Stone, as the book is also known – Stone for short – enjoys a unique status, comparable to the plays of Shakespeare. Apart from its literary merits, Chinese readers recommend it as the best starting point for any understanding of Chinese psychology, culture and society.

So why is this masterpiece so neglected in the West? Does it just reflect a general decline of interest in literature? Or is there something particular about the Chinese case? Are we, perhaps, too obsessed with China’s latest economic statistics to spare a thought for what’s left of its soul? As one philistine academic colleague growled at me not long ago, “Who cares about Chinese poetry anyway?” In British universities, teachers of traditional Chinese literature are in danger of becoming extinct.

For the Chinese, however, The Story of the Stone is a talisman. Three years ago, Madame Fu Ying, Chinese ambassador to the Court of St James (now deputy foreign minister of the People’s Republic of China, and a rising star), demonstrated this when she presented the complete five-volume Penguin edition to the Queen. On my arrival in China in 1980, I was advised by Yang Xianyi, one of Stone’s Beijing translators, that if ever I found myself in a fix with the authorities, I should mention my own connection with the book. I once tested this theory, with the Public Security Bureau – and it worked.

The book was left unfinished by the author Cao Xueqin at his death in 1763 and was eventually published in 1792, with an added conclusion attributed to Gao E. It is written in high-class Peking vernacular, with many unusual expressions and allusions, necessitating dozens of footnotes per chapter for today’s readers. But despite this, and despite its daunting length (twice as long as War and Peace) and its huge dramatis personae (well over 300 main characters), it is still widely read throughout the Chinese-speaking world. Mention of it triggers an instant gleam of recognition, and opens up new possibilities of communication.

At the centre of the plot is a love triangle involving Baoyu, a young aristocratic fop, and his two girl-cousins. These characters divide readers into fiercely opposing camps: some prefer the wilting, anorexic beauty of Miss Lin Daiyu, others admire the healthier, more down-to-earth charms of her rival, Xue Baochai; as for Baoyu, readers either adore him and his aesthetic ecstasies, or consider him a self-indulgent sentimentalist.

The Dreamstone is an English animated television series that ran for 4 series of 13 episodes each between 1990 and 1995. The original concept and artwork were created by Michael Jupp and the series was written by Sue Radley and Martin Gates. The series was produced by Martin Gates Productions (MGP) for a wholly owned subsidiary of Central (a part of Independent Television) and FilmFair. MGP famous for producing, after The Dreamstone, Bimble's Bucket, and others. Subsequently, MGP appointed Monster Entertainment of Dublin to act as worldwide distributor of these rights. [1]

The Dreamstone is set in an alternative world called 'The Land of Dreams,' and concerns itself principally with the struggle between good (personified by The Dream Maker, a Merlin -esque white magician), and evil (personified by Zordrak, Lord of Nightmares).

The Land of Dreams is populated by Noops and Wuts (the defenders of the land, who fly around on leaves and ward off Zordrak's evil forces with staffs that have orbs of light attached to them, through which they communicate).

The Land of Nightmares, also known as the dark side of the planet, is populated mostly by Urpneys , who basically resemble human beings except for the large bulbous nose and tails. They live in Viltheed , a tall black mountain in which resides Zordrak. Although all the Urpneys in Viltheed are male, female Urpneys do exist, as Urpgor has both an auntie and a niece.

The Dreamstone aired between 1990 and 1995 with a total of 52 episodes. Each episode has basically the same plot - Zordrak instructs his henchmen to steal the Dreamstone, which he plans to destroy, so that nightmares will plague the sleeping world. The plan usually involves Urpgor, his right-hand man and scientist inventing some means with which the Urpneys - led by Sergeant Blob, an archetypal Sergeant Major type - crosses the Mist of Limbo (a vast Purple Mist) to get to the Land of Dreams. The plan invariably fails, the main problem being the cowardice and incompetence of the Urpneys, who often want no more than to 'go home' and get some sandwiches.

In the hour-long special of The Dreamstone (A combination of The Dreamstone and Into Viltheed. or The Dreamstone: Parts 1 and 2 ) or 'The Dreamstone - Opening Special', there were three scenes that were deleted in the normal episode of 'The Dreamstone.'

Dream of the Red Chamber, also called The Story of the Stone , composed by Cao Xueqin, is one of China's Four Great Classical Novels. It was written sometime in the ...

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone ...

The Dreamstone is an English animated television series that ran for 4 series of 13 episodes each between 1990 and 1995. The original concept and artwork were created ...

22.12.2017  · Someone is following Sarah Lucas. When she peers down from her apartment window late one night, she sees him hovering in …

Browse and Read The Dream Of The Stone The Dream Of The Stone Reading is a hobby to open the knowledge windows. Besides, it can provide the inspiration and spirit to ...

THE DREAM OF THE STONE .PDF - 1013AAB15594F7B92391997A6BC307FD THE DREAM OF THE STONE Jana Vogel If you might be interested to read this The Dream Of The Stone

The death of the elderly Chinese scholar Zhou Ruchang, noted recently in a Daily Telegraph obituary, draws attention to a startling fact: that China’s greatest work of literature, the 18th-century novel Dream of the Red Chamber, on which Professor Zhou was an acknowledged – and somewhat obsessive – expert, is still virtually unknown in the English-speaking world. And yet a complete and highly readable English translation has been available in Penguin Classics for nearly 30 years.

In its native land, The Story of the Stone, as the book is also known – Stone for short – enjoys a unique status, comparable to the plays of Shakespeare. Apart from its literary merits, Chinese readers recommend it as the best starting point for any understanding of Chinese psychology, culture and society.

So why is this masterpiece so neglected in the West? Does it just reflect a general decline of interest in literature? Or is there something particular about the Chinese case? Are we, perhaps, too obsessed with China’s latest economic statistics to spare a thought for what’s left of its soul? As one philistine academic colleague growled at me not long ago, “Who cares about Chinese poetry anyway?” In British universities, teachers of traditional Chinese literature are in danger of becoming extinct.

For the Chinese, however, The Story of the Stone is a talisman. Three years ago, Madame Fu Ying, Chinese ambassador to the Court of St James (now deputy foreign minister of the People’s Republic of China, and a rising star), demonstrated this when she presented the complete five-volume Penguin edition to the Queen. On my arrival in China in 1980, I was advised by Yang Xianyi, one of Stone’s Beijing translators, that if ever I found myself in a fix with the authorities, I should mention my own connection with the book. I once tested this theory, with the Public Security Bureau – and it worked.

The book was left unfinished by the author Cao Xueqin at his death in 1763 and was eventually published in 1792, with an added conclusion attributed to Gao E. It is written in high-class Peking vernacular, with many unusual expressions and allusions, necessitating dozens of footnotes per chapter for today’s readers. But despite this, and despite its daunting length (twice as long as War and Peace) and its huge dramatis personae (well over 300 main characters), it is still widely read throughout the Chinese-speaking world. Mention of it triggers an instant gleam of recognition, and opens up new possibilities of communication.

At the centre of the plot is a love triangle involving Baoyu, a young aristocratic fop, and his two girl-cousins. These characters divide readers into fiercely opposing camps: some prefer the wilting, anorexic beauty of Miss Lin Daiyu, others admire the healthier, more down-to-earth charms of her rival, Xue Baochai; as for Baoyu, readers either adore him and his aesthetic ecstasies, or consider him a self-indulgent sentimentalist.

The Dreamstone is an English animated television series that ran for 4 series of 13 episodes each between 1990 and 1995. The original concept and artwork were created by Michael Jupp and the series was written by Sue Radley and Martin Gates. The series was produced by Martin Gates Productions (MGP) for a wholly owned subsidiary of Central (a part of Independent Television) and FilmFair. MGP famous for producing, after The Dreamstone, Bimble's Bucket, and others. Subsequently, MGP appointed Monster Entertainment of Dublin to act as worldwide distributor of these rights. [1]

The Dreamstone is set in an alternative world called 'The Land of Dreams,' and concerns itself principally with the struggle between good (personified by The Dream Maker, a Merlin -esque white magician), and evil (personified by Zordrak, Lord of Nightmares).

The Land of Dreams is populated by Noops and Wuts (the defenders of the land, who fly around on leaves and ward off Zordrak's evil forces with staffs that have orbs of light attached to them, through which they communicate).

The Land of Nightmares, also known as the dark side of the planet, is populated mostly by Urpneys , who basically resemble human beings except for the large bulbous nose and tails. They live in Viltheed , a tall black mountain in which resides Zordrak. Although all the Urpneys in Viltheed are male, female Urpneys do exist, as Urpgor has both an auntie and a niece.

The Dreamstone aired between 1990 and 1995 with a total of 52 episodes. Each episode has basically the same plot - Zordrak instructs his henchmen to steal the Dreamstone, which he plans to destroy, so that nightmares will plague the sleeping world. The plan usually involves Urpgor, his right-hand man and scientist inventing some means with which the Urpneys - led by Sergeant Blob, an archetypal Sergeant Major type - crosses the Mist of Limbo (a vast Purple Mist) to get to the Land of Dreams. The plan invariably fails, the main problem being the cowardice and incompetence of the Urpneys, who often want no more than to 'go home' and get some sandwiches.

In the hour-long special of The Dreamstone (A combination of The Dreamstone and Into Viltheed. or The Dreamstone: Parts 1 and 2 ) or 'The Dreamstone - Opening Special', there were three scenes that were deleted in the normal episode of 'The Dreamstone.'

Dream of the Red Chamber , Pinyin romanization Hongloumeng , Wade-Giles romanization Hung-lou-meng , novel written by Cao Zhan in the 18th century; it is generally considered to be the greatest of all Chinese novels.

The work, published in English as Dream of the Red Chamber (1929), first appeared in manuscript form in Beijing during Cao Zhan’s lifetime. In 1791, almost 30 years after his death, the novel was published in a complete version of 120 chapters prepared by Cheng Weiyuan and Gao E . Uncertainty remains about the final 40 chapters of the book; they may have been forged by Gao, substantially written by Cao Zhan and simply discovered and put into final form by Cheng and Gao, or perhaps composed by an unknown author. The Story of the Stone (1973–86) is a complete five-volume English translation.

…a scholarly study of the Dream of the Red Chamber ( Hongloumeng ), an 18th-century novel of tragic love and declining fortunes in a Chinese family. Literature without a clear class moral received blistering criticism, as did any hint that the party should not command art and literature—a theme identified with the…

…in the 16th century) and Dream of the Red Chamber (18th century). On the other hand, Buddhism coalesced with the Confucian (particularly in the neo-Confucian movement of the Song and Ming dynasties) and Daoist traditions to form a complex multireligious ethos within which the “Three religions” ( sanjiao ) were more or…

> Dream of the Red Chamber ), a novel of a love triangle and the fall of a great family, also written in the vernacular and the first outstanding piece of Chinese fiction with a tragic ending. Because its lengthy descriptions of poetry contests, which interrupt the…

…novels such as the Chinese Dream of the Red Chamber (1754; first published in English 1929) and the Japanese Tale of Genji (early 11th century) usually develop organically rather than according to geometrical formulas, one incident or image spinning off another. Probably the most tightly structured work, in the Neoclassicists’…

Dream of the Red Chamber, also called The Story of the Stone , composed by Cao Xueqin, is one of China's Four Great Classical Novels. It was written sometime in the ...

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone ...

The Dreamstone is an English animated television series that ran for 4 series of 13 episodes each between 1990 and 1995. The original concept and artwork were created ...

22.12.2017  · Someone is following Sarah Lucas. When she peers down from her apartment window late one night, she sees him hovering in …

Browse and Read The Dream Of The Stone The Dream Of The Stone Reading is a hobby to open the knowledge windows. Besides, it can provide the inspiration and spirit to ...

THE DREAM OF THE STONE .PDF - 1013AAB15594F7B92391997A6BC307FD THE DREAM OF THE STONE Jana Vogel If you might be interested to read this The Dream Of The Stone

Dream of the Red Chamber, also called The Story of the Stone , composed by Cao Xueqin, is one of China's Four Great Classical Novels. It was written sometime in the ...

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone ...

The Dreamstone is an English animated television series that ran for 4 series of 13 episodes each between 1990 and 1995. The original concept and artwork were created ...

22.12.2017  · Someone is following Sarah Lucas. When she peers down from her apartment window late one night, she sees him hovering in …

Browse and Read The Dream Of The Stone The Dream Of The Stone Reading is a hobby to open the knowledge windows. Besides, it can provide the inspiration and spirit to ...

THE DREAM OF THE STONE .PDF - 1013AAB15594F7B92391997A6BC307FD THE DREAM OF THE STONE Jana Vogel If you might be interested to read this The Dream Of The Stone

The death of the elderly Chinese scholar Zhou Ruchang, noted recently in a Daily Telegraph obituary, draws attention to a startling fact: that China’s greatest work of literature, the 18th-century novel Dream of the Red Chamber, on which Professor Zhou was an acknowledged – and somewhat obsessive – expert, is still virtually unknown in the English-speaking world. And yet a complete and highly readable English translation has been available in Penguin Classics for nearly 30 years.

In its native land, The Story of the Stone, as the book is also known – Stone for short – enjoys a unique status, comparable to the plays of Shakespeare. Apart from its literary merits, Chinese readers recommend it as the best starting point for any understanding of Chinese psychology, culture and society.

So why is this masterpiece so neglected in the West? Does it just reflect a general decline of interest in literature? Or is there something particular about the Chinese case? Are we, perhaps, too obsessed with China’s latest economic statistics to spare a thought for what’s left of its soul? As one philistine academic colleague growled at me not long ago, “Who cares about Chinese poetry anyway?” In British universities, teachers of traditional Chinese literature are in danger of becoming extinct.

For the Chinese, however, The Story of the Stone is a talisman. Three years ago, Madame Fu Ying, Chinese ambassador to the Court of St James (now deputy foreign minister of the People’s Republic of China, and a rising star), demonstrated this when she presented the complete five-volume Penguin edition to the Queen. On my arrival in China in 1980, I was advised by Yang Xianyi, one of Stone’s Beijing translators, that if ever I found myself in a fix with the authorities, I should mention my own connection with the book. I once tested this theory, with the Public Security Bureau – and it worked.

The book was left unfinished by the author Cao Xueqin at his death in 1763 and was eventually published in 1792, with an added conclusion attributed to Gao E. It is written in high-class Peking vernacular, with many unusual expressions and allusions, necessitating dozens of footnotes per chapter for today’s readers. But despite this, and despite its daunting length (twice as long as War and Peace) and its huge dramatis personae (well over 300 main characters), it is still widely read throughout the Chinese-speaking world. Mention of it triggers an instant gleam of recognition, and opens up new possibilities of communication.

At the centre of the plot is a love triangle involving Baoyu, a young aristocratic fop, and his two girl-cousins. These characters divide readers into fiercely opposing camps: some prefer the wilting, anorexic beauty of Miss Lin Daiyu, others admire the healthier, more down-to-earth charms of her rival, Xue Baochai; as for Baoyu, readers either adore him and his aesthetic ecstasies, or consider him a self-indulgent sentimentalist.


Dream of the Red Chamber - Wikipedia

The Dreamstone (episode) | The Dreamstone Wiki | FANDOM.

    Dream of the Red Chamber, also called The Story of the Stone , composed by Cao Xueqin, is one of Chinas Four Great Classical Novels. It was written sometime in the ...Enter your mobile number or email address below and well send you a link to download
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